Multimedia
Precedented EP01: COVID-19 revives racist stereotypes against Chinese people

Precedented EP01: COVID-19 revives racist stereotypes against Chinese people

close
In our new video series, we turn to history to help us understand, and face, today’s biggest issues. As anti-Asian racism rises during the coronavirus outbreak, our first episode explores why the spread of disease often brings with it discrimination, and how, in these uncertain times, the past can help us find ways do better.
Free buses in Lawrence

Free buses in Lawrence

close
As climate change and income inequality spur conversations across the country, many cities are considering changes to make public transportation more reliable for their citizens. Here’s how one city in Massachusetts made their buses free for everyone, and how it's making life a lot easier for those in poverty.
The Redirect: Why facts matter on both sides of abortion debate

The Redirect: Why facts matter on both sides of abortion debate

DeafBlind people have developed a new language that uses touch to communicate

DeafBlind people have developed a new language that uses touch to communicate

close
A new language has been spreading within the DeafBlind community, and has revolutionized how some DeafBlind people communicate. Called Protactile, or PT, the language uses touch as its medium of communication. PT emerged in 2007, when a group of DeafBlind people in Seattle began exploring their natural tactile instinct. Rooted in DeafBlind people's experience, PT aims to resolve previous communication difficulties for DeafBlind people, and advance the community's autonomy. Today, the language has reached thousands of people, and is still evolving.