Topic: Welfare Policy

All Content

  • Rick Santorum: Top 7 culture war moments

    As a senator, Rick Santorum was one of the Republican Party's best-known culture warriors. Now, as a surging presidential contender, Mr. Santorum is still leading the charge, and facing questions about some of his old, and not so old, comments. Here is a sample.

  • Latin America Monitor Venezuela's opposition unites around Capriles. Can he beat Chavez?

    A record turnout of nearly 3 million people voted in Venezuela's opposition presidential primary yesterday, selecting Henrique Capriles Radonski as the candidate.

  • Election 101: Where the GOP candidates stand on the economy

    Election 101: Where the GOP candidates stand on the economy

    With more than 13 million Americans out of work and wage increases so modest they’re failing to keep up with inflation, voters have put the economy and jobs at the top of their checklist of presidential issues. The Republican candidates all share the same broad approach: Spur private-sector confidence and job creation through permanent tax cuts, reduced federal deficits, and lighter regulatory burdens on businesses. In the same vein, they generally call for efforts to boost trade, encourage domestic oil and gas production, and limit the power of organized labor. But who has the best economic plan?

  • Newt Gingrich: 8 of the GOP idea man's more unusual ideas

    Newt Gingrich: 8 of the GOP idea man's more unusual ideas

    Newt Gingrich is a big ideas guy. Ask anybody. Some of the ideas end up working, like the one a couple of decades ago that the Republican Party could actually take control of the House after 40 years of Democratic rule. Others are a little out there. An elaborate system of space mirrors to light highways? Check. Say what you will, but at least the former House speaker – and now the clear front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination – has a fertile imagination. Here are some of his more unusual ideas.

  • In Egypt elections, secular parties rally to stop Islamist tide

    In Egypt elections, secular parties rally to stop Islamist tide

    Ahead of today's second round in Egypt elections, secular candidates took a page out of the Islamists' book and engaged in a punishing schedule of grass-roots campaigning.

  • Payroll tax: House GOP offers new plan

    Payroll tax: House GOP offers new plan

    Payroll tax plan from House Republicans would extend Social Security payroll tax and unemployment benefits, although trimmed from current levels.

  • Eurozone crisis: Who wants what

    Eurozone crisis: Who wants what

    A look at four central players in the eurozone crisis, and what they want.

  • Health insurance for poor? Maine eyes cutting it.

    Health insurance for poor? Maine eyes cutting it.

    Health insurance program costs Maine $40 million in the past two years, says governor, who's expected to unveil plan that cuts the health insurance initiative.

  • The eurozone crisis explained in 5 simple graphs

    The eurozone crisis explained in 5 simple graphs

    Governments have collapsed. Bailouts have run into the hundreds of billions of euros. Greece is drowning in debt, Italy ousted longtime leader Silvio Berlusconi in a bid to claw its way out, and Spaniards rejected the ruling Socialists, hoping that political change might spare them the woes of their neighbors. Still, the two-year debt crisis builds. How did the eurozone get here? The graphics below paint part of the picture: untaxed shadow economies, low productivity, and deficit spending. While deficits have been curtailed significantly since 2009 due to austerity measures, some see deeper systemic problems. Take Greece. "For 10 years, investors basically believed that Greece was Germany," says Jacob Kirkegaard, of the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington. But, he says, Greece is "fundamentally a corrupt, dysfunctional government that is unable to raise enough tax revenue to pay for all of its expenses." Then there's Spain. The size of its debt relative to its economy is a manageable 67 percent, but sluggish growth undermines investors' faith that it can repay loans. Those who lost money in Greece are in no hurry to lose more in Spain.

  • Don't rely on China to keep the world economy going

    The Daily Reckoning Don't rely on China to keep the world economy going

    If China's economy falls, the rest of the world goes with it