Topic: Vladimir Putin

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  • Alina Kabaeva on cover of Russia's Vogue in triumph of celebrity politics

    Alina Kabaeva is gracing the January cover of Russian Vogue. Notable in her own right for being a Gold medalist and Russian parliamentarian, the spotlight instead is on her rumored affair with Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.

  • Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder, named TIME Person of the Year 2010

    Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder, named TIME Person of the Year 2010

    Mark Zuckerberg, who's been portrayed in a Hollywood movie this year and has seen his social media empire grow ever larger, has been named TIME magazine's 'Person of the Year' for 2010. Mark Zuckerberg launched Facebook in 2004.

  • John Hughes WikiLeaks' real victim: old-school code of trust

    Julian Assange and WikiLeaks' indiscriminate release of hundreds of thousands of diplomatic cables wasn't brave journalism or a victory for transparency. Rather, it erodes the code of trust – the relationships – between journalists and diplomats that enabled principled reporting.

  • How NATO-Russia talks on missile defense could halt – or launch – a new arms race

    How NATO-Russia talks on missile defense could halt – or launch – a new arms race

    Some security experts say the most urgent quest of our time is convincing Moscow to allow the US to defend the West with a missile defense shield.

  • WikiLaughs: Top eight WikiLeaks jokes

    WikiLaughs: Top eight WikiLeaks jokes

    Classified diplomatic cables. Sensitive military documents. Lists of vulnerable sites to US interests. WikiLeaks is serious business. But humor is one way the public sifts through the meaning of news. Or at least a way to distract ourselves from looking at those same 12 photos of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange over and over again. Here's a look at the lighter side of WikiLeaks.

  • WikiLeaks: A trivial gain, a profound loss

    Editor's Blog WikiLeaks: A trivial gain, a profound loss

    We know more about the world after the WikiLeaks dump. But because trust and confidentiality are essential in diplomacy, we'll soon know less.

  • WikiLeaks: Five more of the strangest stories to emerge

    WikiLeaks: Five more of the strangest stories to emerge

    The WikiLeaks cable dump has uncovered a lot of downright serious allegations: that the State Department pressured Germany into not criminally investigating the CIA's kidnapping of one of its innocent citizens, that the British government secretly allowed the US to keep cluster bombs on its soil in defiance of a treaty, that the US manipulated the Spanish criminal justice system in its investigation of the CIA's torture of its citizens, and so on. And it also uncovered some very weird stories. Earlier this week, we wrote about how Qaddadfi loves flamenco dancing, how King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia likes the idea of surgically implanting people with tracking chips, and how a 75-year-old US citizen fled Iran on horseback. The leaks keep coming. Here are five more of the oddest stories to come out of the leaked State Department cables.

  • Russia World Cup 2018: Another score for powerful Putin?

    Russia World Cup 2018: Another score for powerful Putin?

    Russia's sports minister likened the geopolitical impact of Russia hosting the 2018 World Cup to the tearing down of the Berlin Wall.

  • Colin Powell gives Obama backing on START nuclear deal

    Colin Powell gives Obama backing on START nuclear deal

    Colin Powell and Obama warned of grave consequences if the Senate fails to ratify the New START pact, which would reduce how many strategic warheads the United States and Russia could hold and set up a system so each could inspect and verify the other's arsenal.

  • Who will host the 2018 World Cup?

    Who will host the 2018 World Cup?

    The 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup hosting rights will be decided today in Zurich, Switzerland. Here's the short list for the 2018 World Cup bid: