Topic: Van Hollen

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  • Who's who on Congress's debt 'super committee'

    Who's who on Congress's debt 'super committee'

    Congress has created a special super committee to devise a way to cut at least $1.2 trillion from US spending in coming years. Its real name is the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, and its deadline is Nov. 23. If a majority of the bipartisan, bicameral committee approves the plan, it goes to the House and Senate for a vote, and they must act by Dec. 23. If the plan is voted down, automatic spending cuts are slated to occur. Here are the 12 lawmakers serving on the super committee.

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  • Who's who on Congress's debt 'super committee'

    Who's who on Congress's debt 'super committee'

    Congress has created a special super committee to devise a way to cut at least $1.2 trillion from US spending in coming years. Its real name is the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, and its deadline is Nov. 23. If a majority of the bipartisan, bicameral committee approves the plan, it goes to the House and Senate for a vote, and they must act by Dec. 23. If the plan is voted down, automatic spending cuts are slated to occur. Here are the 12 lawmakers serving on the super committee.

  • Michele Bachmann, Rand Paul, and 8 others shaking up the new Congress

    Michele Bachmann, Rand Paul, and 8 others shaking up the new Congress

    With the Republican takeover of the House, the shortlist of lawmakers on the rise in both houses of Congress flips, too. Notable is the number of younger members to watch, especially those swept into prominence by the tea party surge. Because this House freshman class - 96 strong, including 87 Republicans - is the largest since 1992, those who speak for them, or claim to, have a leg up. So do those Democrats nimble enough to engage them. Here are ten to watch.

  • Monitor Breakfast Democrats' Election 2010 lament: we are being outspent 5 to 1

    A disproportionate amount of the 'secret money' being contributed to political campaigns in Election 2010 is going to Republicans, says Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chairman Rep. Chris Van Hollen.

  • Did Democrats' deal with the NRA kill campaign finance reform?

    Did Democrats' deal with the NRA kill campaign finance reform?

    At issue is a deal brokered by the House Democratic leadership to exempt the powerful National Rifle Association and others from disclosure requirements in a new campaign finance law.