Topic: U.S. Office of Management and Budget

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  • Recession warning sign: No new jobs added in August

    Recession warning sign: No new jobs added in August

    In the strongest sign yet that the economy is close to slipping into recession, the government reports that the economy added no net new jobs last month. Unemployment remains at 9.1 percent.

  • Bankruptcy of solar firm: ominous sign for industry

    Bankruptcy of solar firm: ominous sign for industry

    Bankruptcy of Solyndra, once touted by President Obama, is third failure of a US solar firm this month. Bankruptcy will serve as fuel for critics of government stimulus.

  • Who's who on Congress's debt 'super committee'

    Who's who on Congress's debt 'super committee'

    Congress has created a special super committee to devise a way to cut at least $1.2 trillion from US spending in coming years. Its real name is the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, and its deadline is Nov. 23. If a majority of the bipartisan, bicameral committee approves the plan, it goes to the House and Senate for a vote, and they must act by Dec. 23. If the plan is voted down, automatic spending cuts are slated to occur. Here are the 12 lawmakers serving on the super committee.

  • Leon Panetta's first day at Pentagon helm: It's not all grim.

    Leon Panetta's first day at Pentagon helm: It's not all grim.

    A tough job awaits Leon Panetta at the Pentagon: three wars, budget cuts, Al Qaeda in Yemen, prospects of a nuclear Iran. But some good news awaits the new Defense secretary, too.

  • White House insists taxes must be part of the debt and deficit solution

    White House insists taxes must be part of the debt and deficit solution

    As debt talks shift to Obama, GOP Speaker John Boehner, and Democratic Senate leader Harry Reid, taxes remain the logjam. No one wants to be seen as giving ground on that issue too quickly.

  • Who will carry out Obama's Afghanistan exit plan? Three new guys.

    Who will carry out Obama's Afghanistan exit plan? Three new guys.

    After President Obama outlines his strategy Wednesday for winding down the 10-year war in Afghanistan – including the rate of US troop withdrawals – it will be the duty of three men, all new in their roles, to get it done. It will be a tough job, and there is likely to be plenty of second-guessing not only about the strategy itself, but also their handling of it, from Congress, pundits, and ex-military types. Here are some clues into what priorities these three defense leaders might set and a look at the particular skills each brings to the task of managing America’s longest war.

  • Opinion A health-care plan Ryan, Obama, and Romney should all get behind

    With health-care costs skyrocketing, the US faces a critical fork in the road. Medicare for all isn't viable, but neither is Paul Ryan's privatized system. Thankfully, we don't have to choose. Having both a private and a public plan isn't just political compromise. It's what's best for Americans.

  • How Leon Panetta could change Washington as next Defense secretary

    How Leon Panetta could change Washington as next Defense secretary

    Leon Panetta, currently CIA director, is a close ally of Vice President Biden. But political realities could prevent him from adopting Mr. Biden's stance on US troops in Afghanistan.

  • Budget stalemate: Why America won't raise taxes

    Budget stalemate: Why America won't raise taxes

    Budget stalemate has many on Capitol Hill crunching numbers. With any new budget, taxes may be the real third rail of politics. Can the U.S. solve its fiscal woes without more revenue?

  • Can tax cuts really pay for themselves?

    Economist Mom Can tax cuts really pay for themselves?

    The Congressional Budget Office just came out with a preliminary analysis of the president's budget, and it doesn't look promising.