Topic: U.S. Census Bureau

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  • Mad as Hell

    Mad as Hell

    British historian Dominic Sandbrook takes an engaging look at the US in the 1970s, seeking for connections between an era of lagging American self-confidence and the rise of today's right wing.

  • Some jobless don't look for jobs. They start a business.

    Some jobless don't look for jobs. They start a business.

    New business starts hit a 14-year high in 2009. But succeeding is a challenge.

  • As world population heads toward a peak, Malthusian worries reemerge

    Editor's Blog As world population heads toward a peak, Malthusian worries reemerge

    By 2050, the planet will add the equivalent of a new China and India in population. Africa is increasingly seen as the new global breadbasket in the quest to feed all those people.

  • Chicago's Latinos get an earful on Rahm Emanuel's immigration record

    Chicago's Latinos get an earful on Rahm Emanuel's immigration record

    Latino voters, likely to be a key bloc in the Chicago mayor's race, get conflicting reports from candidate Rahm Emanuel and his rivals concerning his record on immigration policy.

  • Redistricting 101: Eight facts about redrawing the US political map

    Redistricting 101: Eight facts about redrawing the US political map

    Every 10 years, everyone in the United States gets counted – all 308,745,538 of them, according to the 2010 Census. The number of representatives in Congress, however, stays at 435. Dividing the larger number by the smaller gives the average number of people in each congressional district (now 709,760). But Americans move around a lot – for new jobs or better weather, to be closer to family, or just for the adventure. As a result, the boundaries of those congressional districts have to shift to make sure that each district has as close to the same number of people as possible. And that shifting can have important political, economic, and social consequences. That’s what ‘redistricting’ is all about.

  • Surprise! Women started more firms than men.

    Surprise! Women started more firms than men.

    Before the recession, women were starting twice as many firms as men. Now, they may do even better.

  • 2010 census results: Why did US population growth slow?

    The Vote 2010 census results: Why did US population growth slow?

    The US added some 27 million residents in the past decade. But that population growth is small, percentage-wise – 9.7 percent. Only during the Great Depression decade was the growth rate lower.

  • Five unusual Census 2010 facts

    Five unusual Census 2010 facts

    Which state has more people per square mile than India? Which state saw its smallest population growth in at least a century? The data released Tuesday gives Americans a first look at what Census 2010 is saying about the United States. For example, the US population grew more slowly this past decade – 9.7 percent – than in any decade since the 1930s. Back during the Great Depression, six states lost population. In the first 10 years of the 2000s, only one state was a loser. Do you know which one?

  • Census 2010 results: Republicans' second big win of the year?

    The Vote Census 2010 results: Republicans' second big win of the year?

    The GOP, which won control of the House in midterm elections, stands to gain more seats as a result of the Census 2010 results, which show a population shift from blue states to red.

  • 2010 Census and politics: Are economic forces redrawing congressional map?

    2010 Census and politics: Are economic forces redrawing congressional map?

    It's no coincidence that 'red' states, with looser building codes and freer economies, are gaining people and political clout, say analysts. After 2010 Census, 'blue' states look to be the losers.