Topic: Troubled Assets Relief Program

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  • Senate freshmen: What the 14 new members bring to Capitol Hill

    A freshman Senate class was sworn in Jan. 3, bringing diverse skills and experience – not to mention agendas – to the legislative body. Whether the 14 newest senators help break partisan gridlock, or refuse to work across the aisle, will be the test for the 113th Congress.Twelve were elected on Nov. 6, including three Republicans, eight Democrats, and an independent. In addition, a Republican and a Democrat were appointed to vacant seats after the election. Here is a look at the 14 and what they bring to the Senate:

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  • The Reformed Broker The market needs to scare Washington into re-opening government

    Stock markets are closing lower and lower as the government remains shutdown. Brown argues that a greater fall in stock prices may be the wake-up call Washington needs. The market needs to scare congress straight before Washington will get serious about finalizing a budget plan and re-open the government. 

  • Timeline on the Great Recession

    From Lehman Brothers collapse to the wrenching swings of the stock market – a look back at the major events that marked the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

  • Cover Story 5 lessons of the Great Recession

    Five years after the worst crisis since the 1930s, America has devised safeguards and changed the rules of Wall Street. But could the country really avoid another financial collapse?

  • Tax VOX Uncle Sam's growing investment portfolio

    The federal government has been borrowing rapidly to not only finance recent budget deficits but also make financial investments. These investments now total about $1.1 trillion, and the debt supporting Uncle Sam’s investment portfolio accounts for almost 10 percent of the $11.9 trillion in public debt.

  • Robert Reich Want to avoid bailouts? Break up the big banks.

    It's time to limit the size of banks and break up the biggest ones on Wall Street, Reich writes.

  • AIG, saved by US bailout, now considers suing US government

    AIG may join a lawsuit alleging that the terms of the US government bailout were unfair to investors, but such a move risks infuriating the taxpayers whose money saved it from ruin.

  • Senate freshmen: What the 14 new members bring to Capitol Hill

    A freshman Senate class was sworn in Jan. 3, bringing diverse skills and experience – not to mention agendas – to the legislative body. Whether the 14 newest senators help break partisan gridlock, or refuse to work across the aisle, will be the test for the 113th Congress.Twelve were elected on Nov. 6, including three Republicans, eight Democrats, and an independent. In addition, a Republican and a Democrat were appointed to vacant seats after the election. Here is a look at the 14 and what they bring to the Senate:

  • Three (thin) reasons why Congress could yet avoid the fiscal cliff

    A deadline, the promise of a House vote on whatever the Senate can produce, and a sharp reaction on Wall Street boost prospects that gridlocked lawmakers will act to avert at least some aspects of the fiscal cliff by Jan. 1.

  • General Motors to buy back US-owned stake. US to lose billions?

    General Motors stake owned by the US treasury will be sold over the coming year, assuring a multibillion-dollar loss for the federal government. General Motors will buy back $5.5 billion in shares, and the Treasury will have to sell the rest of the stock at a high price in order to break even on the $50 billion bailout GM received. 

  • Cover Story Five reasons America won't fall off the 'fiscal cliff'

    The political and economic ramifications are too big for Washington to let the large tax increases and spending cuts take effect. But this doesn't necessarily mean lawmakers will craft a decisive solution to the nation's fiscal woes.