Topic: Trey Grayson

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  • Michele Bachmann, Rand Paul, and 8 others shaking up the new Congress

    Michele Bachmann, Rand Paul, and 8 others shaking up the new Congress

    With the Republican takeover of the House, the shortlist of lawmakers on the rise in both houses of Congress flips, too. Notable is the number of younger members to watch, especially those swept into prominence by the tea party surge. Because this House freshman class - 96 strong, including 87 Republicans - is the largest since 1992, those who speak for them, or claim to, have a leg up. So do those Democrats nimble enough to engage them. Here are ten to watch.

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  • Poll: Millennials turn on Obama, don't like Obamacare, either

    President Obama's approval rating among Americans age 18 to 29 – so-called Millennials – is at an all-time low, with nearly half saying they'd recall him. They're down on Washington, in general.

  • Dysfunction in D.C. leads to soaring cynicism among Millennials

    Only 1 in 4 Millennials think the US is headed in the right direction, according to a poll released by the Harvard Institute of Politics, and 48 percent think their vote won't make a difference.

  • Youth vote not as fired up as in 2008. Could that trip up Obama?

    Voters under 30 gave President Obama his margin of victory in at least three states in 2008. In a close race, he'll need the youth vote on Nov. 6 more than ever. But it's not clear he'll get it in the numbers he needs.

  • Millennial voters: Obama gaining, but Romney has an opening

    President Obama has built a 17-point lead among voters ages 18 to 29, but he's struggling among white non-Hispanics. Only 41 percent support the president, according to Harvard's Institute of Politics.

  • Michele Bachmann, Rand Paul, and 8 others shaking up the new Congress

    Michele Bachmann, Rand Paul, and 8 others shaking up the new Congress

    With the Republican takeover of the House, the shortlist of lawmakers on the rise in both houses of Congress flips, too. Notable is the number of younger members to watch, especially those swept into prominence by the tea party surge. Because this House freshman class - 96 strong, including 87 Republicans - is the largest since 1992, those who speak for them, or claim to, have a leg up. So do those Democrats nimble enough to engage them. Here are ten to watch.

  • After the Arizona shooting, the civility movement sees tipping point

    After the Arizona shooting, the civility movement sees tipping point

    Calls for unity in response to the Arizona shooting are seen as an opportunity for the civility movement to tackle partisan rancor.

  • Nine 'tea party' candidates who stand a good chance of winning

    Nine 'tea party' candidates who stand a good chance of winning

    Here’s something both Democrats and the GOP establishment in Washington are going to have to come to terms with: Tea party candidates will win some elections this fall. The only question is, how many? There is already a tea party caucus in Congress, but how much bigger of a room is it going to need to hold its meetings?

  • Christine O'Donnell and 5 other races where Sarah Palin's nod counted

    Christine O'Donnell and 5 other races where Sarah Palin's nod counted

    Sarah Palin has been an avid campaigner this election season, in some cases plucking insurgent candidates from near obscurity to successfully take on more established opponents. Not all of her candidates have won, but in the world of Republican primaries often decided by a relatively small group of conservative voters, Palin’s blessing – which she’s given to 43 candidates – can be a major factor.

  • Will the 'Tea Party' take over Congress?

    Will the 'Tea Party' take over Congress?

    The tea party movement is clearly having major impact on the midterm elections – putting a significant number of more conventional Republicans as well as Democrats into a cold sweat as they look over their shoulders at tea party-backed candidates with a real possibility of winning.

  • Bad economy? Good for the Tea Party.

    Robert Reich Bad economy? Good for the Tea Party.

    Politics is turning anti-establishment because Americans blame the government for the slugging economic recovery. Until unemployment decreases, incumbents are in trouble.