Topic: Taklamakan Desert

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  • In Pictures Space photos of the day: Pollution

    This NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite image of the Gulf of Mexico obtained on May 28, 2010 shows the extent of the oil released from the Deepwater Horizon spill. The oil can be seen as a sheen on the water surface. It is especially evident when the angle of the sun's light that is reflected off of the ocean surface is equal to the viewing angle of the satellite - called sunglint.

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  • In Pictures Space photos of the day: Pollution

    This NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite image of the Gulf of Mexico obtained on May 28, 2010 shows the extent of the oil released from the Deepwater Horizon spill. The oil can be seen as a sheen on the water surface. It is especially evident when the angle of the sun's light that is reflected off of the ocean surface is equal to the viewing angle of the satellite - called sunglint.

  • Gallery World's biggest energy hogs

    CHINA, No. 1: A worker checks pipes at PetroChina's Tarim Oilfield in Taklamakan Desert in China in March 2009. According to the International Energy Agency, China consumed the equivalent of 2.265 billion tons of oil in 2009, which was about 4 percent more than the 2.169 billion tons used in the United States. Nearly three-fourths of China's energy consumption comes from coal. By 2015, the Dragon is expected to consume the equivalent of 2.783 billion tons of oil compared to America's 2.291 billion tons.

  • China confronts global warming dilemma

    China confronts global warming dilemma

    China, the world leader in both economic growth and carbon emissions, faces the dilemma of how to respond to the challenges of global warming while not harming its robust economy.