Topic: Syria

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  • The Monitor's View Lebanon government crisis also shows the seeds of peace

    The militant Shiite group Hezbollah toppled the Hariri government peacefully, even if it was to avoid a possible indictment by a UN panel for an assassination. Using violence now to get its way would only make Hezbollah look guilty for the 2005 bombing, eroding its legitimacy.

  • Photos of the Day Photos of the Day 01/13

    A caparisoned elephant is seen during the annual temple festival in Kochi, southern India. The festival features a colorful procession of decorated elephants and drum concerts.

  • What Hezbollah wants from Lebanon's next government

    What Hezbollah wants from Lebanon's next government

    Talks in Lebanon to form a new cabinet are set to begin Monday. Hezbollah pulled support from the government over opposition to a tribunal investigating the 2005 Rafik Hariri assassination.

  • Lebanon 101: Why Hezbollah hates the Hariri tribunal.

    Lebanon 101: Why Hezbollah hates the Hariri tribunal.

    The collapse of Lebanon's coalition government has pushed the country, once again, to the brink of upheaval. The heavily-armed Hezbollah is furious that Prime Minister Saad Hariri is coperating with a United Nations tribunal investigating the assassination of his father Rafik. Here's what the tribunal is all about, and why Hezbollah opposes it:

  • Hezbollah and allies withdraw, Lebanon government collapses

    Hezbollah and allies withdraw, Lebanon government collapses

    Hezbollah: President Michel Suleiman asked Saad Hariri to stay on as caretaker prime minister after the Iranian-backed militant group Hezbollah and its allies resigned Wednesday and brought down Hariri's government.

  • Hezbollah-led pullout brings down Lebanon's government

    Hezbollah-led pullout brings down Lebanon's government

    Fearing the international indictment of some of its leaders for the 2005 killing of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, Hezbollah ministers resigned Wednesday, causing the collapse of Lebanon's coalition government.

  • Opinion Would a nuclear-armed Iran really be so dangerous?

    Advocates of military strikes against Iranian nuclear facilities assume that a nuclear-armed Iran would be able to blackmail its neighbors. History suggests that's wrong.

  • Lebanon government set to collapse over Hariri tribunal

    Terrorism & Security Lebanon government set to collapse over Hariri tribunal

    Hezbollah was expected to pull out of Lebanon's government today over the country's involvement in the Hariri tribunal, which is expected to indict Hezbollah members in the prime minister's 2005 assassination.

  • In Syria, a kernel of democracy

    In Syria, a kernel of democracy

    The Iraqi refugee crisis in Syria helped open the door for aid and rights groups, serving as one catalyst in the strengthening of civil society.

  • Who are Egypt's Copts, and the Middle East's other Christian populations?

    Who are Egypt's Copts, and the Middle East's other Christian populations?

    Recent attacks against Christians in Egypt and Iraq have drawn attention to the Middle East's Christian populations, which are dwindling as Christians flee violence, political strife, and persecution. Christians made up more than 20 percent of the region's population in the early 20th century, but today, they make up less than 10 percent. Here is a look at the status of Christians in seven key countries, from Egypt to Iran.