Topic: Supreme Islamic Iraqi Council

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  • Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    The US troop surge in 2007 helped quiet Iraq's bloody civil war. But it failed to deliver on what US officials and officers said was crucial for Iraq's future at the time: sectarian reconciliation. Rather than forging a new national identity out of the horrors of Iraq's war, Iraq's Shiite and Sunni Arabs and ethnic Kurds sullenly retreated to their own sectarian corners, and the country's political parties remain vehicles for ethnic or sectarian interests. The next year is probably going to be the most crucial for determining the future of Iraq since the US-led invasion of 2003, as Iraq's various political factions compete for power and influence without foreign troops getting in the way. Here are a few of the major players.

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  • Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    The US troop surge in 2007 helped quiet Iraq's bloody civil war. But it failed to deliver on what US officials and officers said was crucial for Iraq's future at the time: sectarian reconciliation. Rather than forging a new national identity out of the horrors of Iraq's war, Iraq's Shiite and Sunni Arabs and ethnic Kurds sullenly retreated to their own sectarian corners, and the country's political parties remain vehicles for ethnic or sectarian interests. The next year is probably going to be the most crucial for determining the future of Iraq since the US-led invasion of 2003, as Iraq's various political factions compete for power and influence without foreign troops getting in the way. Here are a few of the major players.

  • Backchannels What Arbain in Iraq is like

    A story on the 'Iraqi block party on steroids' from our archives.

  • Backchannels Karbala and the surge of Iraq attacks

    Suicide attacks on Shiite pilgrims. Mass murders of police. It's not 2006 in Iraq anymore, but sometimes it feels like it.

  • Maliki gets Shiite nod to head new Iraqi government

    Maliki gets Shiite nod to head new Iraqi government

    Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki got the backing of Iraq's main Shiite bloc today, leaving him within four seats of the majority needed to form a new government.

  • As US troops leave, Iraq inches toward a new government

    As US troops leave, Iraq inches toward a new government

    Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki met Tuesday with Ayad Allawi to discuss forming a new government and decide who will be prime minister. But the main Shiite, Sunni, and Kurdish factions are still negotiating.

  • Iraq election: Will Prime Minister Maliki lose his job?

    Iraq election: Will Prime Minister Maliki lose his job?

    With 80 percent of the Iraq election votes counted, Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki is neck and neck with former Iraqi Prime Minister Ayad Allawi. Even if Maliki wins the popular vote, he may not be able to hold together a coalition government.

  • Iraqi elections: Why one candidate says he faces a US death threat

    Iraqi elections: Why one candidate says he faces a US death threat

    Abu Mahdi al Mohandas is one of more than 6,000 candidates on the ballot in the Iraqi elections on March 7. But the Shiite politician, now hiding in Iran, says the US considers him a terrorist and a weapons supplier to Iraq militia groups.

  • Iraq's vice president says Iraq should call on US for security help

    Iraq's vice president says Iraq should call on US for security help

    Adel Abdul Mahdi says in an interview with the Monitor that political reluctance to ask US troops for security support should be reconsidered.

  • Thousands in Baghdad mourn Shiite leader Hakim

    Thousands in Baghdad mourn Shiite leader Hakim

    The funeral procession of the influential religious and political figure is to make its way south on Saturday to the holy city of Karbala, and then to Najaf, where Hakim will be buried.

  • Baghdad bombing leaves hole in diplomatic corps

    Baghdad bombing leaves hole in diplomatic corps

    Iraq's Foreign Ministry saw 10 percent of its staff killed or injured. Foreign minister blames systemic security breaches for last week's assault.