Topic: Stephanie Herseth Sandlin

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  • 10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    The 2010 elections were tough on all Democrats, but particularly on female lawmakers. The upcoming 112th Congress may see fewer women in office on Capitol Hill than last session. Yet-to-decided races in the House and Senate will determine if that happens, but if it does, it would be the first time in 32 years that the number of women in Congress declines from one session to the next. What's already clear is that 10 women are not returning. Most of the congresswomen defeated Tuesday were House freshmen. Two had served multiple House terms, and one was a Senate veteran. Some lost to tea party favorites and conservatives backed by Sarah Palin, while others were bested by standard-issue Republicans. Here are the women, some familiar and some not, we will not see on Capitol Hill come January as a result of Election Day losses. Source: CNN, National Journal‚ Almanac of American Politics, Politico

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  • Can Democrats find moderate candidates in time for midterms?

    Democrats may struggle to recruit moderate and conservative-leaning candidates for the 2014 midterm elections in states with the most competitive Senate races.

  • Opinion Surprise: The NRA has actually lost influence on gun control

    In the wake of the tragic shooting in Tucson, Arizona, earlier this month, the calls for gun-control legislation have already begun. But the National Rifle Association's traditional ability to shoot these bills down may be significantly reduced in the future.

  • 10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    The 2010 elections were tough on all Democrats, but particularly on female lawmakers. The upcoming 112th Congress may see fewer women in office on Capitol Hill than last session. Yet-to-decided races in the House and Senate will determine if that happens, but if it does, it would be the first time in 32 years that the number of women in Congress declines from one session to the next. What's already clear is that 10 women are not returning. Most of the congresswomen defeated Tuesday were House freshmen. Two had served multiple House terms, and one was a Senate veteran. Some lost to tea party favorites and conservatives backed by Sarah Palin, while others were bested by standard-issue Republicans. Here are the women, some familiar and some not, we will not see on Capitol Hill come January as a result of Election Day losses. Source: CNN, National Journal‚ Almanac of American Politics, Politico

  • Midterm elections: 12 House races to watch to judge size of a GOP 'wave'

    Midterm elections: 12 House races to watch to judge size of a GOP 'wave'

    Midterm elections upon us, most observers expect Republicans to take over the House of Representatives, though projections vary widely as to how many seats they’ll gain, and a massive number of races – more than 100 – are close enough to go either way. The magic number Republicans need to gain to take control: 39. So how can an Election Night observer get a sense of the big picture amid the many returns coming in? Rather than zeroing in on any individual race, look for trends in those expected to be closest. Here are a handful of races to keep an eye on in the states with early-closing polls.

  • Why the NRA is rallying behind endangered Democrats

    Why the NRA is rallying behind endangered Democrats

    Historically, the NRA has overwhelmingly supported Republicans. But Democrats began backing many pro-gun House candidates in 2006, and now the NRA is coming to their defense.

  • Baucus healthcare plan takes flak from both sides of the aisle

    Baucus healthcare plan takes flak from both sides of the aisle

    Republicans say it's too costly. Liberal Democrats complain that it doesn't do enough for the uninsured. But unlike House plans, it wouldn't add to the deficit.

  • Obama's green team

    Bright Green Obama's green team

    At a news conference in Chicago Monday, Barack Obama announced many of his energy and environment appointees, a team that many say signals a sharp break from Bush administration policies toward pollution, wildlife, clean energy, and climate change.