Topic: Southern Sudan

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  • Gallery Best and worst cities to live in

    BAGHDAD: Mercer’s 2010 annual quality of life survey of 221 cites ranked the Iraqi capital as the worst place in the world to live, and the ongoing war and sectarian violence likely weighed heavily in this rating. A lack of security and political stability continue to undermine Baghdad’s quality of living, Mercer found. Iraqi people, seen here through a shrapnel hole, walk past the site of a car bomb in Baghdad on May 13 after an explosion ripped through a popular cafe the night before.

  • Sudan 101: Could the war over South Sudan spark up again?

    Polls suggest that most southerners will vote for secession in the 2011 referendum, thereby reducing Khartoum's oil revenues. The division of Sudan's oil resources could cause a return to war.

  • Sudan 101: Could Sudan's oil resources solve its problems?

    If oil revenue is concentrated on infrastructure projects in far-flung regions, such as South Sudan and Darfur, it could prevent those areas from falling back into war.

  • Sudan 101: What is the Darfur war about?

    In 2003, rebels in Darfur took up arms to force President Omar al-Bashir's Arab-dominated government to deliver greater autonomy and better governance to the neglected region.

  • Sudan 101: Why does Sudan have so many wars?

    Sudan's size and ethnic diversity have made the country hard to govern. Lack of government attention to far-flung regions has been at the root of wars in Darfur and South Sudan.

  • Sudan election problems: few enough to be legitimate?

    Sudan election problems: few enough to be legitimate?

    As voting ended today in Sudan's election, voters in the south complained about being unable to find their names on the voter rolls. Jimmy Carter says the election is a major stepping stone in the peace process.

  • In Pictures Sudan elections

    A child picks up flags left behind after candidate Salva Kiir hosted an election rally in Juba, Sudan, on April 9. The people of Southern Sudan cast ballots in a national election for the first time in more than two decades on April 11. Sudan's elections commission on April 12 announced a two-day extension to the voting after many voters experienced delays.

  • Sudan election: Is Khartoum stealing South Sudan's oil?

    Sudan election: Is Khartoum stealing South Sudan's oil?

    As people vote in the Sudan election, a recent report says that $700 million – perhaps much more – may have been underpaid to South Sudan since a 2005 peace agreement mandated the sharing of oil revenues with Khartoum in the North.

  • Sudan election: Voters savor a tiny taste of democracy

    Sudan election: Voters savor a tiny taste of democracy

    Day 1 of the complicated three-day election in Sudan ended without violence. Despite a widespread boycott by opposition parties and allegations of fraud, many voters seemed happy just to cast their ballots.

  • Bashir: The only choice left in Sudan elections

    Bashir: The only choice left in Sudan elections

    In the Sudan elections that should have offered a choice between unity or southern secession, political Islam or secular governance, only President Omar Al-Bashir's party is running. Twelve parties are boycotting the vote.