Topic: Scott Boyd

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  • Five ways US default would hit your pocketbook

    Five ways US default would hit your pocketbook

    With the possibility of America defaulting on a debt payment just days away, Americans are hoping for the best but bracing for the worst. Lawmakers are raising alarms. Some investors are scrambling to the safety of gold and foreign currencies. What would a US default mean for the American consumer? Here are five ways it would hit your pocketbook:

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  • Five ways US default would hit your pocketbook

    Five ways US default would hit your pocketbook

    With the possibility of America defaulting on a debt payment just days away, Americans are hoping for the best but bracing for the worst. Lawmakers are raising alarms. Some investors are scrambling to the safety of gold and foreign currencies. What would a US default mean for the American consumer? Here are five ways it would hit your pocketbook:

  • Soft patch? Three reasons economic growth is slowing.

    Soft patch? Three reasons economic growth is slowing.

    For those hoping that the economy is merely going through a “soft patch” right now, the weight of evidence suggests something more serious. Two years after the Great Recession ended, the economic expansion has slowed to an annual rate of 1.8 percent in the first quarter of 2011 versus 3.1 percent in the final quarter of 2010. Why is the rebound so tepid? Here are three key indicators, which historically help boost recoveries, but stand in the way this time:

  • Portugal: strike three for the eurozone?

    The New Economy Portugal: strike three for the eurozone?

    An EU bailout of Portugal now seems inevitable.But at some point, EU taxpayers are likely to tire of bailing out nations like Portugal, which seem unwilling to curb their spendthrift ways.

  • 2011 predictions: interest rates around the world

    2011 predictions: interest rates around the world

    Currency analysts pay obsessive attention to economic factors that indicate the direction of interest rates, because interest rates represent the price of a currency. Any price change has a direct impact on the currency’s value. That can mean huge gains or losses for currency traders, but it also has a big impact on what savers earn, borrowers pay, consumers shell out for imported goods, and global companies plan in terms of compensation and hiring. In 2010, the stress on various currencies became clear, causing many central banks to push interest rates to record lows. Here’s a look at how those forces could play out in 2011 in six major regions of the world:

  • US dollar: Prepare for a prolonged devaluation

    The New Economy US dollar: Prepare for a prolonged devaluation

    US dollar won't fall to peso level, but there's a strong possibility the dollar's slide will last well into next year.

  • China money move: Beijing addresses a glaring weakness

    The New Economy China money move: Beijing addresses a glaring weakness

    China money: The yuan will now be worth more against the dollar, boosting Chinese consumers' buying power.