Topic: San Luis Obispo County

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  • Five things Millennials never want to hear

    The workplace has a recurring habit of throwing generations together and forcing them to cooperate. As Millennials (age 18-30), one of the largest cohorts in modern America, join the labor force, GenXers, boomers, and seniors are having to learn how to get along with their new employees. It isn't always easy. Millennials usually have broader experience with technology than their older colleagues do and are widely regarded as competitive, collaborative, and passionate, but also persistent and self-possessed to the point of feeling entitled to promotions they haven't earned. So here are five things not to say to these young and talented workers along with suggestions on how to improve the communication:

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  • Five things Millennials never want to hear

    The workplace has a recurring habit of throwing generations together and forcing them to cooperate. As Millennials (age 18-30), one of the largest cohorts in modern America, join the labor force, GenXers, boomers, and seniors are having to learn how to get along with their new employees. It isn't always easy. Millennials usually have broader experience with technology than their older colleagues do and are widely regarded as competitive, collaborative, and passionate, but also persistent and self-possessed to the point of feeling entitled to promotions they haven't earned. So here are five things not to say to these young and talented workers along with suggestions on how to improve the communication:

  • Radioactive milk harmless, but will consumers buy it?

    Radioactive milk harmless, but will consumers buy it?

    Radioactive milk, detected in two states, contains tiny amounts of radioactive iodine that probably originated in Japan but pose no health threat. So far, milk sales seem steady.

  • Radioactive milk found on West Coast, but levels are 'minuscule'

    Radioactive milk found on West Coast, but levels are 'minuscule'

    Radioactive milk linked to the Japan nuclear crisis has been detected in samples from California and Washington State. But the amounts are so tiny that they pose no health risk, officials say.

  • In Pictures US nuclear power plants

    An aerial view of Salem and Hope Creek Nuclear Power Plants in New Jersey.