Topic: San Clemente

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  • A California comeback for the bald eagle?

    A mating pair of bald eagles is the first to be discovered on San Clemente Island since eagle restoration efforts began. The national symbol disappeared from California's Channel Islands in the 1960s.

  • Modern Parenthood Forced sexual contact among teens common, says study

    A disturbing new study reveals that 9 percent of youths aged 14 to 21 have coerced or forced someone into sexual contact and spells out a more complicated problem than 'no means no' rhetoric can address.

  • Massive blackout affects California, Arizona, Mexico

    Massive blackout affects California, Arizona, Mexico

    A widespread blackout in the Southwest has sent two nuclear reactors offline, interrupted commutes, and left people and food struggling with temperatures as high as 115 degrees.

  • Hershey walkout: Foreign students nix firms' offer

    Hershey walkout: Foreign students nix firms' offer

    Hershey walkout takes new twist as firms offer cultural tour of US to 400 foreign student workers. But Hershey walkout leaders reject offer, saying the real issue is too much work for too little pay.

  • Photos of the Day Photos of the Day 06/20

    Luke Tinsman, of San Clemente, Calif., eyes a perch while in a fisheye bubble at the Ocean Institute in Dana Point Harbor in Dana Point, Calif.

  • Letters to the Editor – Weekly Issue of June 6, 2011

    Readers write in to decry the treatment of Kentucky Derby horses, rebut Paul Ryan's defense of his budget plan, and spotlight Pakistan's wasted resources on its border 'battle' with India.

  • Tax Day 2011: Why do presidents release tax returns? Hint: 'I am not a ...'

    Decoder Buzz Tax Day 2011: Why do presidents release tax returns? Hint: 'I am not a ...'

    The modern tradition of presidents, vice presidents, and other politicians releasing their tax returns dates back to a non-Watergate Nixon scandal: tax evasion.

  • Ring of fire: the five non-Japan nuclear sites in quake zone

    Ring of fire: the five non-Japan nuclear sites in quake zone

    The circle of seismic activity in the Pacific Ocean, known as the "ring of fire," stretches from Australia to Russia around to Alaska and America's West Coast and down to Chile in South America. It's an area responsible for 90 percent of the world's earthquakes and 75 percent of its volcanoes. So which of the more than 26 nations in the ring has nuclear power? Only three: Japan, of course (more than 50 plants); the United States (eight reactors at four plants); and Mexico (two reactors at one plant). Here's a look at the five non-Japanese plants in the world's most active earthquake zone:

  • Photos of the Day Photos of the Day 09/13

    A plane drops fire retardant on a burning ridge as the sun sets behind it and a wildfire burns west of Loveland, Colo., on Sunday.

  • Spat over leaflets vs. litter: Supreme Court won't hear it

    Spat over leaflets vs. litter: Supreme Court won't hear it

    A lower-court panel had ruled that San Clemente, Calif., which bans distribution of leaflets on car windshields, did not show that the extra litter was enough to justify curbing free-speech rights of the leafletters. The Supreme Court on Monday declined to take the case, which has yet to go to trial.