Topic: Provisional Electoral Council

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  • Five tasks for Haiti's new pop-singer president

    Opinion Five tasks for Haiti's new pop-singer president

    Michel “Sweet Mickey” Martelly has officially – and finally – been proclaimed president-elect of Haiti, and he is savoring his success – in the United States. His victory tour began Tuesday in Washington, where he is meeting with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, along with officials from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Mr. Martelly was finally declared the official winner of the election late last night, more than two weeks after officials from Haiti's Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) announced he had edged out former first lady Mirlande Manigat in a runoff with over 67 percent of the vote. The wait has been long for Haitians, who first went to the polls last November to elect a president, along with a parliament, carrying high expectations that a new leader could end the long nightmare they have endured since the Jan. 12, 2010 earthquake that ravaged their country – and even before. The battered country’s future is now in the hands of the 50-year-old Martelly, a popular singer with little political experience, but who led an impressive campaign. Martlelly will now have the following five immediate tasks to address:

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  • Five tasks for Haiti's new pop-singer president

    Opinion Five tasks for Haiti's new pop-singer president

    Michel “Sweet Mickey” Martelly has officially – and finally – been proclaimed president-elect of Haiti, and he is savoring his success – in the United States. His victory tour began Tuesday in Washington, where he is meeting with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, along with officials from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Mr. Martelly was finally declared the official winner of the election late last night, more than two weeks after officials from Haiti's Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) announced he had edged out former first lady Mirlande Manigat in a runoff with over 67 percent of the vote. The wait has been long for Haitians, who first went to the polls last November to elect a president, along with a parliament, carrying high expectations that a new leader could end the long nightmare they have endured since the Jan. 12, 2010 earthquake that ravaged their country – and even before. The battered country’s future is now in the hands of the 50-year-old Martelly, a popular singer with little political experience, but who led an impressive campaign. Martlelly will now have the following five immediate tasks to address:

  • In Pictures Haiti presidential election

    Haiti's presidential candidate Michel Martelly poses for a photo with supporters at a campaign rally in Gonaives, Haiti, on March 11.

  • How 'Sweet Micky' Martelly transformed from carnival singer to Haiti president

    How 'Sweet Micky' Martelly transformed from carnival singer to Haiti president

    Preliminary results from Haiti's presidential election show that Michel Martelly, also known as 'Sweet Micky,' won in a landslide victory.

  • Haiti elects new president for Herculean task

    Haiti elects new president for Herculean task

    The Haiti election Sunday was marked by many of the same problems voters experienced in a first round tainted with widespread fraud, although this time violence was avoided.

  • Michel 'Sweet Micky' Martelly advances in Haiti election over president's pick

    Michel 'Sweet Micky' Martelly advances in Haiti election over president's pick

    Amid pressure from international observers, Haiti's election commission advanced singer Michel 'Sweet Micky' Martelly into a runoff vote for the presidency against former First Lady Mirlande Manigat.

  • Thousands of Haitians riot in capital over election results

    Thousands of Haitians riot in capital over election results

    A former first lady and government protege will face off in January. Many observers question 'inconsistencies' in the Haiti election results.

  • Haitian stability threatened in wake of contested presidential election

    Haitian stability threatened in wake of contested presidential election

    The streets of Port-au-Prince are largely calm Monday. But a majority of opposition candidates have denounced Sunday's race as fraudulent. Many fear that peace is only temporary.

  • In Pictures Haiti elections

    Thousands of Haitians protest to demand the cancellation of the presidential and legislative elections in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Nov. 28. Haiti's elections ended in confusion as 12 of the 18 presidential candidates denounced 'massive fraud' and called for cancellation of the results. Voters' frustration at not being able to cast their ballots due to organizational problems at many polling stations boiled over into street protests.

  • Wyclef Jean appealing Haiti election ruling, says 'trickery' used

    Wyclef Jean appealing Haiti election ruling, says 'trickery' used

    Wyclef Jean's lawyers announced the hip-hop star is appealing the ruling that barred him from running for president. The Haiti election commission's political independence has been questioned before.

  • Is Wyclef Jean eligible to run for president of Haiti?

    Is Wyclef Jean eligible to run for president of Haiti?

    Wyclef Jean is rumored to be running for president of Haiti. The Haiti Constitution gives six clear requirements for becoming president, however, and Wyclef may not meet them all.