Topic: Project on Student Debt

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  • Financial aid: One of six tools to graduate debt-free

    Financial aid: One of six tools to graduate debt-free

    Financial aid dwindling. Rising tuition. College debt over $20,000. Financing a college education can be as hard as paying off a McMansion on an adjustable-rate mortgage. So why is Zac Bissonnette smiling? The senior art-history major at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is set to graduate debt-free. "The great thing about graduating debt-free is that you have tremendous flexibility in terms of your postgraduation plans," says Mr. Bissonnette, author of "Debt-Free U: How I Paid for an Outstanding College Education Without Loans, Scholarships or Mooching Off My Parents." "You don't have to rush out and take the highest-paying job to make your sacrifices to the almighty church of Sallie Mae." Here are six ways you, too, can trim or eliminate college debt:

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  • Student debt report: More graduates have it ... and have more of it

    Among 2012 graduates of four-year colleges in the US, 71 percent finished school in debt, up from 68 percent in 2008, according to the report. The average estimated student debt: $29,400.

  • Student debt climbs to $29K. What makes a 'value' school?

    As student debt continues to grow, getting the best bang for your buck is becoming more important than ever in choosing a college. In response to growing concerns over student debt, 'Best Value' college lists are popping up everywhere. 

  • Cover Story Bachelor's degree: Has it lost its edge and its value?

    Undervalued and overpriced, the beleaguered bachelor's degree is losing its edge as the hallmark of an educated, readily employable American.

  • Occupy protests spread to US college campuses

    Occupy protests spread to US college campuses

    As the Occupy Wall Street protests have grown to cities across the United States, they've also taken root at US universities, where students have staged rallies and walk-outs from classes.

  • Financial aid: One of six tools to graduate debt-free

    Financial aid: One of six tools to graduate debt-free

    Financial aid dwindling. Rising tuition. College debt over $20,000. Financing a college education can be as hard as paying off a McMansion on an adjustable-rate mortgage. So why is Zac Bissonnette smiling? The senior art-history major at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is set to graduate debt-free. "The great thing about graduating debt-free is that you have tremendous flexibility in terms of your postgraduation plans," says Mr. Bissonnette, author of "Debt-Free U: How I Paid for an Outstanding College Education Without Loans, Scholarships or Mooching Off My Parents." "You don't have to rush out and take the highest-paying job to make your sacrifices to the almighty church of Sallie Mae." Here are six ways you, too, can trim or eliminate college debt:

  • Tired of student loans? These schools will leave you with little debt.

    Tired of student loans? These schools will leave you with little debt.

    College costs are not only what you pay up front, but also what debt you carry into the future. The class of 2009 graduated with an average of $24,000 in debts from student loans, up 6 percent from the previous year, according to a report Thursday from The Project on Student Debt in Oakland, Calif. But the report also identifies 20 four-year public and private nonprofit colleges where graduates took on the least amount of debt – an average of $3,000 to $8,500.

  • Need a college loan? Ask your friends online.

    Need a college loan? Ask your friends online.

    Websites are cropping up for peer lending, and at other sites, students can raise donations for college.

  • Study: U.S. financial aid fails students who need it most

    The $86 billion system is so complex and piecemeal that experts call for an overhaul.

  • College students: Don't limit dreams with debt

    Huge school loans can hinder future growth. Think about potential income before signing the dotted line.

  • Too few low-income college students?

    Too few low-income college students?

    Pressure mounts on colleges to reduce barriers for that pool of talent.