Topic: Pluto (Dwarf Planet)

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  • Where did life exist on Mars? NASA chooses landing site for Curiosity rover

    Where did life exist on Mars? NASA chooses landing site for Curiosity rover

    Curiosity rover, formally known as the Mars Science Laboratory, will land at the foot of an 18,000-foot mountain in Gale crater, NASA announced Friday. The mount is expected to yield unparalleled information on where and when life might have existed on Mars.

  • Pluto moon discovery hints at future surprises for NASA probe

    Pluto moon discovery hints at future surprises for NASA probe

    Pluto moon: The tiny new moon — announced July 20 and called P4 for now — brings the number of known Pluto satellites to four.

  • In a NASA first, NanoSail-D spacecraft to set sail on the sunlight

    In a NASA first, NanoSail-D spacecraft to set sail on the sunlight

    NASA's NanoSail-D is expected to test a type of propulsion that taps the momentum of photons in sunlight. Advocates say solar sails provide the best way toward interstellar travel.

  • "How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming" made Mike Brown a lot of enemies

    Chapter & Verse "How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming" made Mike Brown a lot of enemies

    Cal Tech astronomer and author Mike Brown helped to demote Pluto from planethood – and got a lot of hate mail as a result.

  • Should Pluto be restored as a planet? Experts weigh in.

    Should Pluto be restored as a planet? Experts weigh in.

    New calculations indicate that Pluto might be the largest object in the outer solar system. Does it now deserve to be called a planet again?

  • Moon's got water, yeah. But it's got other resource goodies, too.

    Moon's got water, yeah. But it's got other resource goodies, too.

    Besides water, frigid craters at the moon's poles hold other resources that astronauts might be able to use to sustain lunar bases. There's even a bit of silver.

  • In Pictures Space photos of the day: Deep Impacts

    Meteor Crater is one of the youngest and best-preserved impact craters on Earth. The crater formed roughly 50,000 years ago when a 30-meter-wide, iron-rich meteor weighing 100,000 tons struck the Arizona desert at an estimated 20 kilometers per second. The resulting explosion exceeded the combined force of today's nuclear arsenals and created a 1.1-kilometer-wide, 200-meter-deep crater. Meteor Crater is a simple crater since it has no central peak or rim terraces.

  • In Pictures Space photos of the day 08/16

    At about 300 feet from the cargo bay of the space shuttle Challenger, Bruce McCandless II was farther out than anyone had ever been before. Guided by a Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), astronaut McCandless, pictured above, was floating free in space. McCandless and fellow NASA astronaut Robert Stewart were the first to experience such an 'untethered space walk' during Space Shuttle mission 41-B in 1984. The MMU works by shooting jets of nitrogen and has since been used to help deploy and retrieve satellites.

  • Rare failed star found circling sun-like star

    Rare failed star found circling sun-like star

    The newfound failed star, known as a brown dwarf, has been dubbed PZ Tel B. It is separated from its sun-like companion star, PZ Tel A, by a distance similar to that between Uranus and the sun in our solar system.

  • In Pictures Space photos of the day 07/29

    This enhanced-color image of the northern hemisphere of Saturn taken by Voyager 1 on November 5, 1980 at a range of 5.5 million miles shows a variety of features in Saturn's clouds. Time-lapse images of cloud features like those shown in this image not only provide information on how these storms evolve with time, but provide a way to measure atmospheric wind speeds.