Topic: Pfizer Inc.

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  • Five major SOPA supporters

    The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and its Senate counterpart, the Protect IP Act or PIPA, would allow the US government to seek a court order and even shut down websites that contain content or links “committing or facilitating online piracy.”  Moreover, advertisers and Internet service providers would be banned from doing business with violators.However, payment and advertising networks, search engines or service providers that take voluntary action to redress detected violations – by terminating businesses with transgressor sites or comply with the law – will be granted immunity from liability charges.On Sept. 22, 2011, more than 350 trade associations, professional and labor organizations, and businesses signed a letter urging Congress to enact legislation to stop “rogue sites” from copyright infringement.Here are five key SOPA and PIPA supporters:

  • How five websites are protesting SOPA

    Five major websites will go dark on Wednesday protesting two Congressional bills, which critics argue could curtail Internet and free speech.    If passed, The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and its Senate counterpart, the Protect IP Act or PIPA, would allow the US government to seek a court order and even shut down websites that contain content or links to unauthorized copyrighted content.  Moreover, advertisers and Internet service providers would be banned from doing business with transgressors.Proponents of the legislation include companies that are trying to protect their copyrights, such as the Motion Picture Association of America, The NBA, Pfizer, Nike, L'Oreal, as well as the US Chamber of Commerce, the Fraternal Order of Police, and the US Conference of Mayors.However,  voices of opposition include Internet giants Google, Yahoo!, Facebook, Twitter, eBay, Mozilla, and Wikipedia – who say that the proposed laws constitute a First Amendment violation, promote censorship, and harm the democratic flow of information.  Check out how five major websites plan to protest SOPA and PIPA:

  • Robert Reich Romney can take risks. He's rich.

    Mitt Romney is casting his campaign as a defense of free enterprise, hard work, and risk-taking. Easy for him to say: the higher you go on the economic ladder, the easier it is to make money without taking any personal financial risk at all. The lower you go, the bigger the risks.

  • Stocks fall late, erasing midday gains

    Stocks fall late, erasing midday gains

    Stocks slid in late afternoon trading. The Dow lost 66 points Tuesday to close at 11954, after gaining as much as 126 points earlier. Stocks on the Nasdaq and S&P 500 also suffered losses.

  • Stocks creep higher after steep losses

    Stocks creep higher after steep losses

    Stocks calmed down after Monday's big declines. Stocks on the Dow gained 69 points by noon Tuesday.

  • Stocks mixed as Europe pursues wider bailout powers

    The Dow  rose 52 points to close at 12150 following a report that European leaders are considering more aggressive programs to bail out weaker countries in the region.

  • SOPA Internet bill: Newspapers and op-ed writers pile on

    Horizons SOPA Internet bill: Newspapers and op-ed writers pile on

    Last week, tech companies such as Google and Yahoo spoke out against SOPA and PIPA, two bills aimed at cracking down on online copyright infringement in a way that some call overbearing. Now, with newspapers running more pieces critical of the legislation, the opposition could intensify.

  • SOPA fight over 'Internet censorship' attracts Yahoo, Google

    Horizons SOPA fight over 'Internet censorship' attracts Yahoo, Google

    SOPA "jeopardizes" Internet business, claim Twitter, Google, Yahoo and others. The SOPA bill amounts to "Internet censorship," some argue.

  • U.S. stocks fall amid Greek turmoil

    U.S. stocks fall amid Greek turmoil

    U.S. stocks face another day of steep losses. The Dow is down 235 points to 11724 in early afternoon trading as Greece takes a vote on unpopular European austerity measures meant to rescue the Greek economy. U.S. stocks on the Nasdaq and S&P indexes are also being hit hard.

  • Stocks fall as Europe's debt worries deepen

    Stocks fall as Europe's debt worries deepen

    The Dow fell 110.96 points to 11,139.30 in its worst start to September since 2002