Topic: Peabody Essex Museum

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  • In Pictures Moshe Safdie: Architecture designed for dignity

    World-renowned architect, Moshe Safdie, designed the United States Institute of Peace headquarters, opening this fall in Washington D.C. The building has an atrium view directed toward the Lincoln Memorial. The roofline, sheathed with curvilinear shapes, billows upward like the fluttering wings of a dove. Safdie has been honored with the moniker 'global citizen' for creating humane spaces around the world.

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  • In Pictures Moshe Safdie: Architecture designed for dignity

    World-renowned architect, Moshe Safdie, designed the United States Institute of Peace headquarters, opening this fall in Washington D.C. The building has an atrium view directed toward the Lincoln Memorial. The roofline, sheathed with curvilinear shapes, billows upward like the fluttering wings of a dove. Safdie has been honored with the moniker 'global citizen' for creating humane spaces around the world.

  • Beijing treasures: a hidden world on view

    Beijing treasures: a hidden world on view

    In a rare exhibit, treasures from a Chinese emperor's private retreat in the Forbidden City are on display at the Peabody Essex Museum.

  • Curator extraordinaire of Chinese art

    Curator extraordinaire of Chinese art

    Curator Nancy Berlinger's rare access began with shipping a humble 200-year-old Chinese home to Salem, Mass.

  • In Pictures Treasures from the Forbidden City

    Qianlong Garden Complex. The exhibit "The Emperor's Private Paradise: Treasures from the Forbidden City" at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts displays exquisite art objects, furnishings, screens and wall hangings from the Qianlong Garden Complex of the Forbidden City in China. Since 1924, the doors had been closed on this secluded compound of pavilions and gardens deep within the palace.

  • China's irrepressible modern art scene

    China's irrepressible modern art scene

    Contemporary artists don't shy from expressing their humor, subversiveness, and originality despite the country's more austere official image.

  • Collecting antiques can equal cultural survival

    Collecting antiques can equal cultural survival

    Wealthy Russians and Chinese buy antiques to recover pieces of their heritage.