Topic: No Child Left Behind

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  • Eight ingredients for a peaceful society

    Opinion Eight ingredients for a peaceful society

    What makes for a peaceful society? Hot spots from Congo to the Middle East would benefit from such knowledge. But so would the United States, which, at home, isn’t always so harmonious and abroad, is still at war in Afghanistan. The Institute for Economics and Peace, an international research group, has come up with eight ingredients for more peaceful societies. They’re laid out in a report, “Structures of Peace,” based on the institute’s annual Global Peace Index and more than 300 data sets from around the world. The US does pretty well on five of them, but falls far short on three key ingredients. Michael Shank, vice president of the institute’s US office gives his take on eight ingredients America needs to reap the economic and social benefits of peace.

  • Election 101: Where the GOP candidates stand on immigration, abortion and other social issues

    Election 101: Where the GOP candidates stand on immigration, abortion and other social issues

    Social policies are a defining issue in this, or any, Republican race. With the GOP electorate increasingly focused on social issues in recent decades, their leaders' views have shifted in kind. At stake: the support of the powerful evangelical conservatives, so-called values voters for whom social issues like abortion are deciding factors. While they have their differences, all the main candidates espouse conservative social values. Take a look at where each of them stands. 

  • The Monitor's View A test for America's reading skills in NAEP scores

    Latest test scores from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reveal slow progress in reading skills since 1992. Fortunately, Congress may refocus the No Child Left Behind law on better teaching of literacy.

  • Senate vote: first step toward dismantling No Child Left Behind

    Senate vote: first step toward dismantling No Child Left Behind

    A Senate panel votes to drop a signature provision of No Child Left Behind, the Bush-era education reform. The new law would eliminate the mandate for 'adequate yearly progress.'

  • Can new No Child Left Behind law pass before 2012 elections?

    Can new No Child Left Behind law pass before 2012 elections?

    A new No Child Left Behind bill is finally getting a hearing in the Senate Wednesday – after three years of sitting in limbo. The bill has bipartisan support, and plenty of detractors.

  • To Be Heard: movie review

    To Be Heard: movie review

    The documentary 'To be heard' profiles three teens from the Bronx who attend a radical poetry workshop to help them shape their own futures.

  • No Child Left Behind: with waivers, Obama offers states flexibility

    No Child Left Behind: with waivers, Obama offers states flexibility

    No Child Left Behind is under fire, with President Obama offering waivers to some states, allowing them to pursue their own plans for school improvements and accountability.

  • While Obama gets aggressive on jobs bill, GOP plays nice ... for now

    The Vote While Obama gets aggressive on jobs bill, GOP plays nice ... for now

    Republican House leaders haven't been slamming President Obama's jobs proposal. But it's not a new political Age of Aquarius. They all face re-election, and voters are fed up with partisanship.

  • Back to school: Are we leaving gifted students behind?

    Back to school: Are we leaving gifted students behind?

    Gifted students in US public schools can be overlooked and unappreciated. Parents, looking for better options, have begun to find some.

  • US moves to head off states' revolt over No Child Left Behind

    US moves to head off states' revolt over No Child Left Behind

    With some states in open revolt against education reforms in the No Child Left Behind law, the Obama administration prepares to issue waivers from certain requirements. But states must agree to a different set of reforms to qualify.