Topic: Nidal Malik Hasan

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  • Why is Anwar Al-Awlaki terrorist 'No. 1?'

    Why is Anwar Al-Awlaki terrorist 'No. 1?'

    Muslim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki is thought to be connected to at least three alleged terrorist attacks, including the Fort Hood shootings, the Christmas Day bombing attempt on an airliner, and the May 2 Times Square bomb.

  • Senators chastise Pentagon, subpoena Fort Hood documents

    Senators chastise Pentagon, subpoena Fort Hood documents

    The two senators leading Congress's Fort Hood investigation on Monday subpoenaed the Obama administration for documents and witnesses that the Pentagon has refused to provide.

  • Senators losing patience in Fort Hood probe, threaten subpoenas

    Senators losing patience in Fort Hood probe, threaten subpoenas

    The administration is wary of allowing Sens. Joe Lieberman and Susan Collins open access to front-line agents in their investigation into the Fort Hood shootings, which left 13 people dead.

  • Yemen balks at possible US strike on cleric Anwar al-Awlaki

    Yemen said this weekend it is not hunting Anwar al-Awlaki, the US-born cleric who has been linked to the Fort Hood shooter and Christmas Day underwear bomber. Awlaki was recently added to the CIA's hit list.

  • Anwar al-Awlaki: Is it legal to kill an American in war on terror?

    Anwar al-Awlaki: Is it legal to kill an American in war on terror?

    Anwar al-Awlaki is an American hiding in Yemen. Tied to the Fort Hood shooting and Christmas Day bomber, he is thought to be plotting attacks on the US. In fighting the war on terror, the Obama administration has put him on the kill-or-capture list.

  • Jihad Jane case suggests rising threat from online 'jihobbyists'

    Jihad Jane case suggests rising threat from online 'jihobbyists'

    'Jihobbyists' are people drawn to the online theater of violent jihad, becoming increasingly radical as they delve deeper into Web forums. Colleen LaRose, also known as 'Jihad Jane,' is an example of this threat, according to counterterrorism experts.

  • 'Jihad Jane' joins growing list of American terror suspects

    'Jihad Jane' joins growing list of American terror suspects

    Homegrown militants like Jihad Jane are joining the Islamist terror threat to the US. For some, it's as much about social distress as it is about radical ideology.

  • Gallery American Jihadis

    AMINE EL KHALIFI. An artist's courtroom sketch shows Amine El Khalifi, an illegal immigrant from Morocco, as he is brought before a judge in the federal courthouse in Alexandria, Va., on Feb. 17, 2012. El Khalifi, who lives in Alexandria, was arrested near the US Capitol wearing a vest he believed was full of Al Qaeda-supplied explosives and is charged in an attempted suicide bombing of Congress, the Justice Department said. He had been given the gun and the explosives in the suicide vest by the FBI in a sting operation. The explosives and gun had been rendered inoperable and posed no danger to the public.

  • Homegrown terrorism a growing concern for US intelligence

    Homegrown terrorism a growing concern for US intelligence

    Homegrown terrorism is a growing threat, US intelligence chief Dennis Blair said this week. But the number of American Muslims engaged in extremist activity remain small and still largely focused overseas.

  • Terrorism? Fort Hood report doesn’t mention Islamic extremism.

    Terrorism? Fort Hood report doesn’t mention Islamic extremism.

    At congressional hearings Wednesday on Fort Hood, House Armed Services Committee Republicans said Islamic extremism is the ‘800 pound gorilla’ in the room.