Topic: Mutual Fund Management

Featured

  • Five ways big banks' Libor scandal affects you

    London, this year's host of the Olympics, is also home to a bank scandal that threatens to rock the financial world as much as the Games influence the world of sports. Here's why: Libor (London Interbank Offered Rate) is a global benchmark for interest rates that reaches deep into the international financial system. Allegations that banks rigged those rates means that everyone from mortgage-holders and indebted students to cities and mutual funds may have had their interest rates unnaturally altered. Already tainted by other scandals, banks are under investigation because of charges that they profited illegally from their rate-rigging scheme. The mess further taints big banks and puts more strain on the credibility of the global financial system. Here are five ways the Libor scandal could affect you:

All Content

  • The Simple Dollar How does a mutual fund work?

    A mutual fund is a big collection of different investments, and it can be a good way to diversify your holdings. But there are some drawbacks.

  • Tax VOX The burden of choice weighs on the tax system

    The current taxation of derivatives is complicated and inconsistent, Rosenthal writes. Investors often use these tax differences to manipulate the character, timing, or source of their income to reduce their tax liability, he adds.

  • Timothy Geithner pressures SEC to change money-market rules

    Timothy Geithner is putting pressure on the Securities and Exchange Commission to overhaul its rules for money-market mutual funds. Geithner warned that without an overhaul to the money-market system, US financial stability would remain threatened. 

  • Five ways big banks' Libor scandal affects you

    London, this year's host of the Olympics, is also home to a bank scandal that threatens to rock the financial world as much as the Games influence the world of sports. Here's why: Libor (London Interbank Offered Rate) is a global benchmark for interest rates that reaches deep into the international financial system. Allegations that banks rigged those rates means that everyone from mortgage-holders and indebted students to cities and mutual funds may have had their interest rates unnaturally altered. Already tainted by other scandals, banks are under investigation because of charges that they profited illegally from their rate-rigging scheme. The mess further taints big banks and puts more strain on the credibility of the global financial system. Here are five ways the Libor scandal could affect you:

  • Seven retirement questions you need to answer

    Retirement planning isn't easy. Nearly half of Americans don't feel financially prepared to live to age 75, according to a survey from Northwestern Mutual. But the process is a lot less burdensome if you break the task down into simpler parts. Here are seven questions to ask as you plan for your long-term financial security in retirement.

  • Monitor Breakfast What keeps SEC chairwoman up at night? Money market funds (+video)

    The health of money market funds leads the list of worries of SEC chairwoman Mary Schapiro, America's top financial market regulator. Past wild swings in the stock market rank up there, too.

  • A "window dressing" stock market rally

    The Reformed Broker A "window dressing" stock market rally

    Window dressing is the phenomenon where mutual fund managers and other institutions that report quarterly performance results will buy more shares in their biggest holdings headed into the end of a month, quarter or year. If it sounds illegal, it is.

  • Money market funds get boost from jittery investors

    Money market funds get boost from jittery investors

    Money market funds gained $69 billion in August, while stock and bond funds lost $32 billion. Besides money market funds, investors put $1 billion into ETFs.

  • Mutual funds: August tough on stock pickers

    Mutual funds: August tough on stock pickers

    Mutual funds trying to earn higher returns faced a nearly impossible task. Individual stocks are tracking the S&P index more now than in at least the last 20 years, a conundrum for managers of mutual funds.

  • US economy 'has barely budged': 1.3 percent growth in GDP

    US economy 'has barely budged': 1.3 percent growth in GDP

    The GDP grew at an annual rate of only 1.3 percent in the second quarter of 2011, announces the Commerce Department, which also revised first-quarter growth down to 0.4 percent.