Topic: Morocco

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  • Morocco's referendum on reform: Model for Arab Spring?

    Morocco's referendum on reform: Model for Arab Spring?

    Some Western observers see Morocco's referendum on constitutional reform today as forging a new path for embattled Arab leaders. It is widely expected to pass, but many protesters boycotted.

  • Can fresh Morocco protests build momentum for reform?

    Can fresh Morocco protests build momentum for reform?

    Thousands of activists took to the streets Sunday, but many Moroccans are satisfied at the pace of change in the kingdom, especially after King Mohammed VI's Friday speech promising reforms.

  • In Pictures Unusual military hats

    A member of Norway's Hans Majestet Kongens Garde (His Majesty the King's Guard) is seen during a changing of the guard ceremony in Oslo.

  • Small but positive signs of progress with Congo's 'conflict minerals'

    Africa Monitor Small but positive signs of progress with Congo's 'conflict minerals'

    Recent actions taken against Congo's 'conflict mineral' trade by companies and the international community signal that although progress is slow, it is happening.

  • Backchannels The House of Saud strikes back

    Saudi Arabia isn't taking this whole democracy thing lying down. It's putting down uprisings, beefing up alliances with fellow autocrats, and distancing itself from the US.

  • 20 of the smartest nonfiction titles for summer reading

    20 of the smartest nonfiction titles for summer reading

    Some of this summer's best books will introduce you to Machu Picchu, hippie physicists, Parisian walks, and a serial imposter. And that’s just the nonfiction.

  • Strauss-Kahn: Wealthy wife rides to his rescue

    Strauss-Kahn: Wealthy wife rides to his rescue

    Dominique Strauss-Kahn's wife, Anne Sinclair, has posted her husband's $6 million bond. Where did Anne Sinclair, the Barbara Walters of France, get her wealth?

  • Are you middle class? Take our quiz to find out.

    Are you middle class? Take our quiz to find out.

    It's undeniable the middle class is growing in China, Brazil and India. But in the US, the term "middle class," is notoriously vague. Almost everyone, it seems, identifies themselves as middle class, regardless of wealth, income, profession, or education. That's why most politicians will describe policies they oppose as "punishing the middle class" and policies that they support as "helping the middle class." One popular definition, provided by The Drum Major Institute for Public Policy, identifies American families as middle class if they have incomes between $25,000 and $100,000 each year. That's a wide spread, but a perhaps a useful one: If you see someone who makes $75,000 a year more than you as belonging to your class, you're much less likely to revolt against them. But is it true? Grab a pencil and piece of paper – or a Mont Blanc pen and some embossed gold floral deckle edge stationery – and take our quiz to find out where you stand in America's socioeconomic pecking order.

  • In Pictures Way beyond vacation: the 'Eat, Pray, Love' effect

    Tyler, Carol, Stefan and Rainer Jenss with river guide along the Mae Nam Pai River, near Pai, Thailand (November 2008). The Jenss family was on the cusp of a new, growing trend among families: extended travel.

  • L'Amour Fou: movie review

    Documentary about the French couturier Yves Saint Laurent, 'L'Amour Fou' is ultimately more about his companion of 50 years, Pierre Bergé.