Topic: Mike Kelly

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  • 10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    The 2010 elections were tough on all Democrats, but particularly on female lawmakers. The upcoming 112th Congress may see fewer women in office on Capitol Hill than last session. Yet-to-decided races in the House and Senate will determine if that happens, but if it does, it would be the first time in 32 years that the number of women in Congress declines from one session to the next. What's already clear is that 10 women are not returning. Most of the congresswomen defeated Tuesday were House freshmen. Two had served multiple House terms, and one was a Senate veteran. Some lost to tea party favorites and conservatives backed by Sarah Palin, while others were bested by standard-issue Republicans. Here are the women, some familiar and some not, we will not see on Capitol Hill come January as a result of Election Day losses. Source: CNN, National Journal‚ Almanac of American Politics, Politico

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  • Why obesity is on the rise globally

    Researchers found more than 2 billion people worldwide are now overweight or obese. The highest rates were in the Middle East and North Africa, where nearly 60 percent of men and 65 percent of women are heavy.

  • Former IRS commissioner apologizes on Capitol Hill: 'Foolish mistakes were made'

    Stephen Miller, the ousted acting commissioner of the IRS, appeared before the House Ways and Means committee Friday and apologized for the agency's inappropriate investigation of tea party and other conservative organizations.

  • Libya hearings: Will political vitriol squelch effort to improve security?

    One main purpose for congressional hearings into the terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, is to find out how to improve security for US diplomats. But political point-scoring could get in the way.

  • In Gear Dealers balk at 2025 gas mileage rules

    Manufactures, environmental groups, and the White House have approved new rules for cars requiring 54.5 mpg on cars by 2025. But dealers think the rules will lead to a dearth of cars that consumers actually want to buy.

  • Is Obama 'dangerous' because he wants you to buy a Chevy Volt? Newt says yes.

    Newt Gingrich is railing against President Obama for using federal money to subsidize hybrid plug-ins like the Chevy Volt, likening the vehicle to 'cultural warfare.' Some Republicans agree.

  • Bipartisan plea for $4 trillion in deficit cuts: why it could work

    Bipartisan plea for $4 trillion in deficit cuts: why it could work

    A bipartisan group of 100 House members will call for the deficit 'super committee' to make massive deficit cuts – even if it means entitlement or tax reform. The strong backing could be key.

  • All of a sudden, Congress is full of debt ceiling solutions

    All of a sudden, Congress is full of debt ceiling solutions

    With the deadline approaching, the House and Senate are going down two different paths in search of a deal to raise the debt ceiling. Here is a rundown of what they are considering.

  • Medicare: Republicans voice resolve as they prepare to face constituents

    Medicare: Republicans voice resolve as they prepare to face constituents

    House Republicans, heading home for a recess days after a Democrat won a special election in New York, say they're ready to explain their stance on Medicare reform to voters.

  • On the budget, House GOP's fiery freshmen reveal a pragmatic side

    On the budget, House GOP's fiery freshmen reveal a pragmatic side

    They held budget negotiators' feet to the fire, but the GOP House freshmen also proved to be flexible. Too, their voting record for their first 100 days in office is less monolithic than many had expected.

  • 10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    The 2010 elections were tough on all Democrats, but particularly on female lawmakers. The upcoming 112th Congress may see fewer women in office on Capitol Hill than last session. Yet-to-decided races in the House and Senate will determine if that happens, but if it does, it would be the first time in 32 years that the number of women in Congress declines from one session to the next. What's already clear is that 10 women are not returning. Most of the congresswomen defeated Tuesday were House freshmen. Two had served multiple House terms, and one was a Senate veteran. Some lost to tea party favorites and conservatives backed by Sarah Palin, while others were bested by standard-issue Republicans. Here are the women, some familiar and some not, we will not see on Capitol Hill come January as a result of Election Day losses. Source: CNN, National Journal‚ Almanac of American Politics, Politico