Topic: Michelle Rhee

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  • Teacher layoffs ahead: Should seniority prevail? Six considerations.

    Teacher layoffs ahead: Should seniority prevail? Six considerations.

    Thousands of teachers are being notified this spring that their jobs are in jeopardy – and many of those layoffs may actually occur, given the severe budget crises affecting state and local governments. The result is renewed scrutiny of the seniority rules that govern layoffs in many states. Just in the past month, Florida has done away with such rules, and Georgia is on its way.

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  • Change Agent 'Parent power' film stirs hopes among education reform activists

    Reviewers called it trite and dull, but education reformers on both the left and right have hailed 'Won't Back Down' as a potential game-changer for public education.

  • Teacher layoffs ahead: Should seniority prevail? Six considerations.

    Teacher layoffs ahead: Should seniority prevail? Six considerations.

    Thousands of teachers are being notified this spring that their jobs are in jeopardy – and many of those layoffs may actually occur, given the severe budget crises affecting state and local governments. The result is renewed scrutiny of the seniority rules that govern layoffs in many states. Just in the past month, Florida has done away with such rules, and Georgia is on its way.

  • Drive for education reform has teachers unions on the defensive

    Drive for education reform has teachers unions on the defensive

    Even supporters of teachers unions have been critical of them in recent months, forcing unions to collaborate with school districts on education reform as never before.

  • NJ Gov. Chris Christie wants to end teacher tenure – and he's not alone

    NJ Gov. Chris Christie wants to end teacher tenure – and he's not alone

    Just this week, state officials in New Jersey, Florida, and Idaho have called for the elimination of teacher tenure, and more states plan to join the debate.

  • Ideas for a better world in 2011

    Ideas for a better world in 2011

    In many ways, 2010 is a year you may want to relegate to the filing cabinet quickly. It began with a massive earthquake in Haiti and wound down with North Korea once again being an enfant terrible – bizarrely trying to conduct diplomacy through brinkmanship. In between came Toyota recalls and egg scares, pat downs at airports and unyielding unemployment numbers, too little money in the Irish treasury and too many bedbugs in American sheets. Oil gushed from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico for three months, mocking the best intentions of man and technology to stop it, while ash from a volcano in Iceland darkened Europe temporarily as much as its balance sheets. Yet not all was gloomy. The winter Olympics in Canada and the World Cup in South Africa dazzled with their displays of athletic prowess and national pride, becoming hearths around which the world gathered. In Switzerland, the world's largest atom smasher hurled two protons into each other at unfathomable speeds. Then came the year's most poignant moment – the heroic and improbable rescue of 33 miners from the clutches of the Chilean earth. There were many transitions, too – the return of the Republicans in Washington and the Tories in Britain, the scaling back of one war (Iraq) and the escalation of another (Afghanistan), the fall of some powers (Greece) and rise of others (China, Germany, Lady Gaga). To get the new year off to the right start, we decided to ask various thinkers for one idea each to make the world a better place in 2011. We plumbed poets and political figures, physicists and financiers, theologians and novelists. Some of the ideas are provocative, others quixotic. Some you will agree with, others you won't. But in the modest quest to stir a discussion – from academic salons to living rooms to government corridors – we offer these 25 ideas.

  • Teachers' union target Michelle Rhee to raise $1 billion for education reform

    Teachers' union target Michelle Rhee to raise $1 billion for education reform

    Former D.C. schools chancellor Michelle Rhee, famous for battling teachers' unions, creates Students First to forward her education reform priorities.

  • Which cities are most willing to tackle education reform?

    Which cities are most willing to tackle education reform?

    A report released Tuesday ranks cities not in terms of best-performing schools but on their openness to outside ideas and education reform.

  • Is Michelle Rhee the new face of education reform?

    Is Michelle Rhee the new face of education reform?

    The chancellor of Washington, D.C., public schools puts teacher performance at the center of a controversial bid to remake one of the nation’s most troubled urban school districts.

  • For Obama, split looms over education reform

    For Obama, split looms over education reform

    His pick for Education secretary, Chicago's Arne Duncan, faces a divide among Democrats.

  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers write about VP picks, establishing learning habits, Western media, and folk music.