Topic: Max Baucus

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  • Health care law's future: four scenarios

    Health care law's future: four scenarios

    One year ago, President Barack Obama signed a sweeping health-care law to fulfill a long-standing Democratic pledge to ensure health-care coverage for all Americans. Passage of the law was a major legislative victory for Obama and helped change the political landscape, but not always in the way Democrats had hoped. Republicans strongly opposed the law and successfully worked public skepticism about it into sweeping election victories in November. Here's a look at the uncertain future of the health care law:

  • Conrad makes a case against tax subsidies

    Tax VOX Conrad makes a case against tax subsidies

    Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad is an important player in tax reform.

  • Opinion Hyperinflation led to Hitler and Mao. What will China's currency manipulation lead to?

    China's currency manipulation aggravates US politicians, but it could also upend its own economic gains. By keeping the yuan artificially low, China increases inflation to dire levels. Instead of whining about the policy, the US must emphasize this dangerous tradeoff to China.

  • Can Obama, Lee sell lawmakers on US-South Korea free trade deal?

    Can Obama, Lee sell lawmakers on US-South Korea free trade deal?

    Just as hopes were fading for the US-South Korea Free Trade Agreement, negotiators came to terms on prying open the South Korean motor vehicle market to placate angry US carmakers and labor unions.

  • Deficit commission's work is finished. What happens next?

    Deficit commission's work is finished. What happens next?

    A 60 percent majority on Obama's bipartisan deficit commission say they approved the co-chairs' recommendations, not enough to force a vote in Congress. Will their work have an impact?

  • Congress lets unemployment benefits expire: 'What now' and six other questions

    Congress lets unemployment benefits expire: 'What now' and six other questions

    More than 2 million unemployed people awoke Wednesday to the prospect that they may no longer have unemployment checks to help them pay rent or buy food and gas. Congress on Tuesday failed to renew an extension of unemployment benefits that it passed at the end of July. Democrats have argued that with unemployment at 9.6 percent, many people still need help. Republicans say they would like to help the jobless, but want the $5 billion per month cost to be funded by a spending cut somewhere in the federal budget.

  • Who will get Bush tax cuts? Congress can't decide.

    Who will get Bush tax cuts? Congress can't decide.

    Unable to agree on who should be eligible to continue to receive the Bush tax cuts, which expire Jan. 1, President Obama and congressional leaders decided to convene a panel Tuesday.

  • The Monitor's View Campaign financing machine cranks up for midterm elections

    Special interest groups are spending five times as much on this year's midterm elections as compared to 2006. Many of their donors can't be traced. Congress must require disclosure.

  • Senate enters total gridlock as Election 2010 nears

    Senate enters total gridlock as Election 2010 nears

    Democrats failed to move forward on a bill that would have ended a tax break critics say rewards companies who send jobs abroad. Legislation is going nowhere ahead of Election 2010.

  • The Postcatastrophe Economy

    The Postcatastrophe Economy

    Macroeconomic sage Eric Janszen makes a case that the same forces that caused the last economic crash will cause the next one too.