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Topic: Mary Schapiro

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  • Facebook IPO: Six key dates in its debacle

    Facebook's first week as a publicly traded company will go down as a terribly botched corporate launch, perhaps one of the worst in recent history for such a highly visible entity. Eight days ago, it was the tech world's most highly anticipated initial public offering in eight years. Now, the social media company faces mounting legal woes and serves as an embarrassing example of how not to run an IPO. Despite rising insider pessimism about its growth prospects, Facebook kept boosting its asking price and the number of shares it would sell. The result: billions of dollars in losses; investigations by two congressional committees, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), an industry watchdog, and the state of Massachusetts; at least 13 class-action lawsuits; and thousands of resentful shareholders who days later still were unsure how many Facebook shares they had or at what price. Here are six key dates in Facebook's unfolding IPO disaster.

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  • Timothy Geithner pressures SEC to change money-market rules

    Timothy Geithner is putting pressure on the Securities and Exchange Commission to overhaul its rules for money-market mutual funds. Geithner warned that without an overhaul to the money-market system, US financial stability would remain threatened. 

  • Dimon in the hot seat before Congress

    The JPMorgan Chase CEO was in front of Congress for a second time; he is under fire for a $2 billion trading loss.

  • JPMorgan Chase CEO: Shareholders had risk info

    JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon insisted his bank did its best to inform investors about its risk strategy preceding its $2 billion-plus trading loss. JPMorgan Chase used risk assessment models that provided the best information at the time, according to Dimon.

  • Facebook IPO: Six key dates in its debacle

    Facebook's first week as a publicly traded company will go down as a terribly botched corporate launch, perhaps one of the worst in recent history for such a highly visible entity. Eight days ago, it was the tech world's most highly anticipated initial public offering in eight years. Now, the social media company faces mounting legal woes and serves as an embarrassing example of how not to run an IPO. Despite rising insider pessimism about its growth prospects, Facebook kept boosting its asking price and the number of shares it would sell. The result: billions of dollars in losses; investigations by two congressional committees, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), an industry watchdog, and the state of Massachusetts; at least 13 class-action lawsuits; and thousands of resentful shareholders who days later still were unsure how many Facebook shares they had or at what price. Here are six key dates in Facebook's unfolding IPO disaster.

  • Facebook stock: Once hot IPO now a tale of lawsuits, glitches, and overreach (+video)

    Facebook stock is trading well below its initial offering price. The IPO is being viewed as a debacle for the firm and its investment backers, and the lawsuits have already begun.

  • Robert Reich We're turning America into a giant casino

    Organized gambling is a scam. And it particularly preys upon people with lower incomes – who assume they can’t make it big any other way, who often find it hardest to assess the odds, and whose families can least afford to lose the money. Yet with new, relaxed gambling laws, America is now opening the floodgates.

  • JOBS Act: Why are Democrats suddenly raising red flags?

    No one wants to vote against jobs, but a wide swath of critics – ranging from the SEC, the AFL-CIO, and pension funds – worry that features in the proposed JOBS Act could hurt investors.

  • Monitor Breakfast SEC's Schapiro: Budget undersized to fulfill new market-watchdog duties

    The Securities and Exchange Commission has new duties under the 2010 financial reform law, but SEC chairwoman Mary Schapiro says the agency's budget is not 'appropriately sized' to do the job. 

  • Monitor Breakfast How social media complicate SEC crackdown on insider trading (+video)

    Social media services such as Facebook and Twitter pose special challenges for regulators working to halt insider trading, says Mary Schapiro of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

  • Monitor Breakfast What keeps SEC chairwoman up at night? Money market funds (+video)

    The health of money market funds leads the list of worries of SEC chairwoman Mary Schapiro, America's top financial market regulator. Past wild swings in the stock market rank up there, too.

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Danny Bent poses at the starting line of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass.

After the Boston Marathon bombings, Danny Bent took on a cross-country challenge

The athlete-adventurer co-founded a relay run called One Run for Boston that started in Los Angeles and ended at the marathon finish line to raise funds for victims.

 
 
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