Topic: Mark Twain

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  • Six ways the rich really do get richer

    Six ways the rich really do get richer

    “Class warfare:” Lately this old term has been taking on new life as political theater, a way to rebuke Wall Street protestors, and, predictably, fodder for Fox News. According to Google, in just the last month alone, 3,870 articles have been published containing these words. Another way to express the concept of rich vs. not-so-rich is the expression, “The rich get richer and the poor get poorer.” It’s been around for a long time: According to Wikipedia, William Henry Harrison went there in 1840: “I believe and I say it is true Democratic feeling, that all the measures of the government are directed to the purpose of making the rich richer and the poor poorer.” I’m not going to take a stand on either side of the “class warfare” debate by saying that the rich do or don’t take unfair advantage of the rest of society. This is America, where we all have the potential to become rich. But I will say this unequivocally: The rich do get richer, or at least have the potential to. Let’s count the ways:

  • Grant’s Final Victory

    Grant’s Final Victory

    Charles Bracelen Flood offers a fascinating coda to a remarkable life in this brisk, well-told history of the final months and days of Ulysses S. Grant.

  • 'Prohibition' – so much more than gangsters and flappers

    Culture Cafe 'Prohibition' – so much more than gangsters and flappers

    This Sunday (8 to 10 p.m. EDT) Ken Burns turns his prodigious research efforts and illuminating camerawork loose on America's failed attempt to sober up.

  • A century later, a Massachusetts library lifts its ban on a Mark Twain short story

    Chapter & Verse A century later, a Massachusetts library lifts its ban on a Mark Twain short story

    Just in time for Banned Books Week, the Charlton, Mass., library reversed its ban on Twain's story "Eve's Diary."

  • Fall books: 20 nonfiction titles you don't want to miss

    Fall books: 20 nonfiction titles you don't want to miss

    From the energy crisis to The Doors, from Hitler’s Germany to Rin Tin Tin, here are the nonfiction titles that have readers buzzing this fall.

  • Jackie Chan lives, but so do celebrity death hoaxes

    Jackie Chan lives, but so do celebrity death hoaxes

    Jackie Chan: A Facebook Page proclaiming that Jackie Chan had died of a heart attack on Aug. 17 caused a stir. But the fake news was also old news.

  • Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms, by Carmela Ciuraru

    Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms, by Carmela Ciuraru

    Carmela Ciuraru takes a playful look at the history of pen names and the reasons authors use them.

  • Backchannels Pinkwashing: Another gay Middle Easterner who isn't on the level?

    Move over Thomas McMaster. You've got competition from 'Marc,' who claims he's an LGBT activist jilted by the Gaza flotilla.

  • Golf summit: Obama and Boehner win $2 each

    The Vote Golf summit: Obama and Boehner win $2 each

    No word on what the president and the House speaker talked about during their golf summit Saturday. But Obama and Boehner shared a cart. And they outshot Team Biden-Kasich.

  • Monitor Breakfast Q&A: Newt Gingrich

    Monitor Breakfast Monitor Breakfast Q&A: Newt Gingrich

    After reassuring reporters "the reports of my campaign's death were highly exaggerated," former House Speaker and current candidate for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination Newt Gingrich told reporters at a Christian Science Monitor Breakfast that, among other things, Republicans needed to win the debate over Medicare or risk creating "for Obama the Harry Truman moment of coming back and winning by being against us."