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  • Ideas for a better world in 2011

    In many ways, 2010 is a year you may want to relegate to the filing cabinet quickly. It began with a massive earthquake in Haiti and wound down with North Korea once again being an enfant terrible – bizarrely trying to conduct diplomacy through brinkmanship. In between came Toyota recalls and egg scares, pat downs at airports and unyielding unemployment numbers, too little money in the Irish treasury and too many bedbugs in American sheets. Oil gushed from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico for three months, mocking the best intentions of man and technology to stop it, while ash from a volcano in Iceland darkened Europe temporarily as much as its balance sheets. Yet not all was gloomy. The winter Olympics in Canada and the World Cup in South Africa dazzled with their displays of athletic prowess and national pride, becoming hearths around which the world gathered. In Switzerland, the world's largest atom smasher hurled two protons into each other at unfathomable speeds. Then came the year's most poignant moment – the heroic and improbable rescue of 33 miners from the clutches of the Chilean earth. There were many transitions, too – the return of the Republicans in Washington and the Tories in Britain, the scaling back of one war (Iraq) and the escalation of another (Afghanistan), the fall of some powers (Greece) and rise of others (China, Germany, Lady Gaga). To get the new year off to the right start, we decided to ask various thinkers for one idea each to make the world a better place in 2011. We plumbed poets and political figures, physicists and financiers, theologians and novelists. Some of the ideas are provocative, others quixotic. Some you will agree with, others you won't. But in the modest quest to stir a discussion – from academic salons to living rooms to government corridors – we offer these 25 ideas.
    12/26/2010 12:56 pm

All Content

  • Why Tyson Gay scandal is not Marion Jones all over again

    Top US sprinter Tyson Gay acknowledged that he has tested positive for a banned substance, rocking the track-and-field world. But the news also points to how much has changed in antidoping.

  • Focus Ben Johnson to Lance Armstrong: A chronology of doping scandal

    Athletes accused of using banned substances threaten the integrity of sports ranging from track and field to baseball and cycling. Will the NFL be next? Here is a look at key moments in the evolution of sports doping.

  • Opinion After Lance Armstrong doping: Time for Nike to just do it – fairly

    By taking the initiative to donate funds to anti-doping agencies and research, the company would not only help redeem itself ethically after steadfastly backing Armstrong and other Nike athletes who’ve doped. It would also boost its brand image – and surely its market share.

  • Michael Phelps: Will his Olympic medal records ever be broken?

    Sure, everyone loves a bit of Michael Phelps hyperbole, but it is almost inconceivable that his Olympic career gold and total-medal marks could be broken in any foreseeable future.   

  • Roger Clemens acquittal could boost Hall of Fame bid (+video)

    Standards for conviction are clear in court, less so in baseball, where Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro have been bypassed for the Hall thus far despite distinguished careers.

  • Lance Armstrong rides on as doping allegations fall by wayside

    Seven-time Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong has always denied doping allegations. On Friday, US prosecutors said they couldn't make a case stick.

  • Ideas for a better world in 2011

    In many ways, 2010 is a year you may want to relegate to the filing cabinet quickly. It began with a massive earthquake in Haiti and wound down with North Korea once again being an enfant terrible – bizarrely trying to conduct diplomacy through brinkmanship. In between came Toyota recalls and egg scares, pat downs at airports and unyielding unemployment numbers, too little money in the Irish treasury and too many bedbugs in American sheets. Oil gushed from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico for three months, mocking the best intentions of man and technology to stop it, while ash from a volcano in Iceland darkened Europe temporarily as much as its balance sheets. Yet not all was gloomy. The winter Olympics in Canada and the World Cup in South Africa dazzled with their displays of athletic prowess and national pride, becoming hearths around which the world gathered. In Switzerland, the world's largest atom smasher hurled two protons into each other at unfathomable speeds. Then came the year's most poignant moment – the heroic and improbable rescue of 33 miners from the clutches of the Chilean earth. There were many transitions, too – the return of the Republicans in Washington and the Tories in Britain, the scaling back of one war (Iraq) and the escalation of another (Afghanistan), the fall of some powers (Greece) and rise of others (China, Germany, Lady Gaga). To get the new year off to the right start, we decided to ask various thinkers for one idea each to make the world a better place in 2011. We plumbed poets and political figures, physicists and financiers, theologians and novelists. Some of the ideas are provocative, others quixotic. Some you will agree with, others you won't. But in the modest quest to stir a discussion – from academic salons to living rooms to government corridors – we offer these 25 ideas.
    12/26/2010 12:56 pm

  • Spain's 'Operation Greyhound' nabs one of the country's most decorated athletes

    Marta Domínguez, world champion in the 3,000-meter steeplechase, was one of 14 athletes, coaches, doctors, and others arrested in Spain's latest anti-doping investigation.
    12/10/2010 01:45 pm

  • Tour de France: Can Lance Armstrong keep his Teflon image?

    As the Tour de France gets under way, defrocked 2006 winner Floyd Landis has put forward fresh, detailed doping allegations against Lance Armstrong. But Armstrong has become as famous for deflecting scandal as for leading the peloton.
    07/06/2010 01:06 pm

  • Editorial Board Blog Floyd Landis: three reasons he should rethink his stance

    Cyclist Floyd Landis says he doesn't feel guilty for doping. Really?
    05/20/2010 05:21 pm

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Danny Bent poses at the starting line of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass.

After the Boston Marathon bombings, Danny Bent took on a cross-country challenge

The athlete-adventurer co-founded a relay run called One Run for Boston that started in Los Angeles and ended at the marathon finish line to raise funds for victims.

 
 
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