Topic: Law

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  • Vague language is OK in early debt reduction talks

    Donald Marron Vague language is OK in early debt reduction talks

    Non-specific terms like 'tax reform' and 'entitlement changes' help rally people around the idea that some changes must be made

  • Libyan rebels offer cease-fire. Does Qaddafi have the upper hand?

    Libyan rebels offer cease-fire. Does Qaddafi have the upper hand?

    Even as Qaddafi gains on the battlefield, Western officials say his regime is "crumbling" from the inside. A trusted family envoy reportedly met with British officials in London this week.

  • Photos of the Day Photos of the Day 03/31

    A Russian circus artist performs with his snake during the dress rehearsal of the Miracle and Mirage show of the Russian water circus at Budapest's Grand Circus.

  • The five best online April Fools' pranks

    The five best online April Fools' pranks

    Every April Fools' Day, tech-savvy pranksters jam up the Web with a range of gags and jokes. We survey some of the best online April Fools' pranks, from upside-down You Tube videos to the promise of real, live Facebook pokes.

  • Budget battle: Four points of advice from Ike

    Opinion Budget battle: Four points of advice from Ike

    We can only begin to imagine the depth of the political fissures once Congress seriously addresses our budget challenges as opposed to punting tough compromises down the road with last-minute, stop-gap spending bills. Just consider the intensity of the heat generated today over the Republicans’ continued resolve to cut “only” $100 billion from President Obama’s proposed budget for this year, which still would leave a massive deficit in excess of $1.4 trillion. Ultimately, Americans must consider a painful, indelicate balance of much larger spending cuts along with tax increases, coupled with the need for crucial investments in our nation’s future. In confronting these agonizing political choices, both parties, and the electorate, would benefit from advice from “Ike.” Such advice can be found in President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s memorable (though little remembered) radio and television address on taxes in 1954. The address was delivered on March 15, which was Tax Day back then. Its value lies not in its details but in what he said about the government’s role domestically, about sound budgeting, and about being a “good American.” These words, from a Republican, challenged listeners then regardless of party, as they will challenge listeners today. Mount Holyoke College tax-policy scholar John O. Fox gives us Ike's four critical pieces of advice.

  • How AU's boycott of London Libya meeting may hurt Africa's interests

    How AU's boycott of London Libya meeting may hurt Africa's interests

    The African Union may be frustrated that the Western powers didn't give their Libya mediation efforts a chance, but analysts say the AU's refusal to join today's international meeting in London limits Africa's influence.

  • Do Israel's recent efforts to bolster security undermine its democracy?

    Do Israel's recent efforts to bolster security undermine its democracy?

    A spate of recently-passed bills in the Israeli Knesset are seen by sponsors as necessary for the state's security, but critics say they infringe on civil rights.

  • Opinion The Obama Doctrine is bad foreign policy

    In his speech about Libya last night, President Obama articulated his thinking about intervention quite clearly – and it's quite clearly unacceptable.

  • Supreme Court set to take up massive Wal-Mart discrimination case

    Supreme Court set to take up massive Wal-Mart discrimination case

    On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will decide whether 1.5 million women can form a 'class' that faced the same injury – in this case, gender-based discrimination by Wal-Mart – or not.

  • How Libya's Qaddafi brought humanitarian intervention back in vogue

    How Libya's Qaddafi brought humanitarian intervention back in vogue

    The notion of humanitarian intervention went dormant after the Iraq war, but has now returned, championed by many of the same countries that were the greatest opponents of invading Baghdad.