Topic: Kyrgyz Politics

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  • How 5 revolutions got their names

    Questions are cropping up about the appropriateness of calling Tunisia's uprising the "Jasmine Revolution" – stemming from the fact that the term has been used in reference to Syria in 2005 and even the path that brought ousted Tunisian President Ben Ali to power. But the moniker could stick, at least partially because it's become a tradition of sorts to name the revolutions of the 2000s after colors and flowers and even household items. Here's an overview of some of the popular revolutions – and their nicknames – that preceded Tunisia's ... whatever you want to call it:

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  • Backchannels Why closure of Kyrgyzstan air base is point of no return for Afghan war

    Manas base was crucial for the transit of NATO soldiers and supplies into Afghanistan. The closure Tuesday – little remarked on by the US press – short circuits debate on more troops for Afghanistan.

  • Russian hydroelectric project strengthens bond with Kyrgyzstan

    A project to build four hydroelectric power stations will extend the Kremlin's footprint in Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyz officials welcome the investment, which could boost their economy.

  • Russia bolsters influence in Kyrgyzstan as US nears airbase exit

    Vladimir Putin is getting most of what he wants out Kyrgyzstan, including a lease extension on a Russian airbase and part ownership of a torpedo plant, while America's star there is on the wane.

  • US-Russia 'reset' gets a boost with Russian offer of airbase

    Russia has made an unprecedented offer that indicates a desire to improve ties ahead of the US withdrawal from Afghanistan.  

  • Kyrgyzstan elections: Unity top priority for Atambayev

    Kyrgyzstan elections: Unity top priority for Atambayev

    Newly elected Kyrgyzstan President Almazbek Atambayev has said his biggest challenge will be to unify the country, which has seen two revolutions and a string of questionable elections during the past decade.

  • How 5 revolutions got their names

    Questions are cropping up about the appropriateness of calling Tunisia's uprising the "Jasmine Revolution" – stemming from the fact that the term has been used in reference to Syria in 2005 and even the path that brought ousted Tunisian President Ben Ali to power. But the moniker could stick, at least partially because it's become a tradition of sorts to name the revolutions of the 2000s after colors and flowers and even household items. Here's an overview of some of the popular revolutions – and their nicknames – that preceded Tunisia's ... whatever you want to call it:

  • In Pictures Current women heads of state

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel (l) welcomes the President of Argentina Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner (r) at the chancellery in Berlin, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2010.

  • Ambiguity surrounding Kyrgyzstan elections raises fresh concern of instability

    Ambiguity surrounding Kyrgyzstan elections raises fresh concern of instability

    The Kyrgyz government Wednesday approved a controversial vote recount, raising the specter of fresh instability in a country whose political system has been shattered by two violent revolutions in barely five years.

  • Kyrgyzstan elections signal unease with parliamentary rule

    Kyrgyzstan elections signal unease with parliamentary rule

    Weekend Kyrgyzstan elections came off smoothly and fairly. But they also demonstrate popular unease with reforms designed to prevent a return to one-man rule.

  • Photos of the Day Photos of the Day 08/05

    A woman and a child pass graffiti promoting Wyclef Jean's presidential bid on the streets of Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti, on Thursday. Jean will announce his bid for president of earthquake-ravaged Haiti this week, Time magazine has reported. Haiti, which was hit on Jan. 12 by a deadly 7.0-magnitude earthquake, is scheduled to vote on November 28 to elect a new leader to replace President Rene Preval, whose term ends in February.