Topic: Journal Le Monde

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  • WikiLeaks 101: Five questions about who did what and when

    WikiLeaks 101: Five questions about who did what and when

    The WikiLeaks controversy pits one hallowed purpose of US government – preventing security threats from abroad – against another, that of protecting constitutional rights of expression by the media and individuals. Striking that balance has become difficult in an age of the Internet hackers, bloggers, self-appointed public policy watchdogs, and thousands of online “publications” marked by ideology and attitude. So far, WikiLeaks has released more than 700,000 sensitive or classified documents about US military and diplomatic activity – 92,000 on the war in Afghanistan, 392,000 on the Iraq war, and now nearly 250,000 diplomatic cables that US officials say are damaging to foreign relations and intelligence operations. Within weeks, WikiLeaks says, it’ll release inside information on business interests – starting with a major American bank. WikiLeaks 101 is your guide to understanding what happened. Here are answers to five key questions.

  • Interpol targets WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange with 'red notice'

    Terrorism & Security Interpol targets WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange with 'red notice'

    International police agency Interpol has issued a 'red notice' for WikiLeaks' Julian Assange as officials seek ways to detain him.

  • Forget Iran. In Britain, WikiLeaks focus is on details about Prince Andrew.

    Forget Iran. In Britain, WikiLeaks focus is on details about Prince Andrew.

    WikiLeaks' diplomatic cables revealed how Prince Andrew, in his role as a UK trade ambassador, criticized France and America and condemned 'idiotic' British anticorruption investigators.

  • Did WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange commit a crime?

    Terrorism & Security Did WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange commit a crime?

    The US Justice and Defense departments are investigating whether they can press charges against Australian citizen and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, possibly under the Espionage Act.

  • WikiLeaks: Top 5 revelations

    WikiLeaks: Top 5 revelations

    The newest WikiLeaks release comprises 251,287 cables from more than 250 United States embassies around the world, including thousands classified "Secret." With historical cables dating back to the 1960s, the trove is seven times the size of "The Iraq War Logs," making it the world's largest classified information release. The New York Times, Der Spiegel, El País, the Guardian, and Le Monde had early access to the logs. According to their analysis of the myriad issues discussed in the cables, these five are among the most striking revelations.

  • Currency exchange rates 'war' a concern ahead of IMF meeting

    Currency exchange rates 'war' a concern ahead of IMF meeting

    Currency exchange rates have taken center stage in financial markets, prompting investors to worry that nations will try devaluation as a way to bolster exports. The IMF's annual meeting is Friday in Washington.

  • France bristles at comparison of Roma roundups to Nazi tactics

    Global News Blog France bristles at comparison of Roma roundups to Nazi tactics

    France may face fines or disciplinary action from the European Union for its Roma roundups. EU officials likened the policy to Nazi-era tactics.

  • Why 'Islamophobia' is less thinly veiled in Europe

    Why 'Islamophobia' is less thinly veiled in Europe

    How anti-Muslim sentiment is different in European countries than in America.

  • UN report on Congo genocide could be game-changer

    Africa Monitor UN report on Congo genocide could be game-changer

    Guest blogger Lauren Seay says that the leaked UN report on the possible Congo genocide, which implicates the Rwandan government, brings crucial facts to light that could bring justice to the region.

  • Rwanda dismisses UN report detailing possible Hutu genocide in Congo

    Rwanda dismisses UN report detailing possible Hutu genocide in Congo

    Rwanda responded angrily to a leaked UN report that said the country’s Tutsi-led Army might have carried out a Hutu genocide in the Congo.