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Topic: John Boozman

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  • Senate's 16 new members arrive on Capitol Hill: Who are they?

    Starting this Monday, the Senate welcomes 16 fresh faces to the Capitol’s marbled halls. While they won’t be sworn into office until January, these newly-elected members – three Democrats and 13 Republicans – come to Washington to tour the buildings, learn rules of decorum, and meet with their future coworkers. The new Senators come largely from open seats where both parties had a new candidate on the ticket and include a handful of tea partyers.
    11/16/2010 07:15 pm

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  • Robert Reich Obama budget: Why entitlement cuts are a 'grand bargain' we don't need

    President Obama's willingness to negotiate on Social Security – which Democrats have protected from Republican assaults for almost eighty years – doesn’t bode well, Reich writes.

  • The Vote Rand Paul 'detained' by TSA. Does that happen to other senators?

    TSA could hardly have singled out a worse person for pat-down treatment than Sen. Rand Paul, up-and-coming libertarian standard-bearer and son of GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul. He's not the only one on Capitol Hill to complain about pat-downs.

  • PIPA and SOPA: What you need to know

    As PIPA and SOPA work their way through Congress, the controversial bills have raised many questions. The most common: Wait, what are PIPA and SOPA?

  • Senate's 16 new members arrive on Capitol Hill: Who are they?

    Starting this Monday, the Senate welcomes 16 fresh faces to the Capitol’s marbled halls. While they won’t be sworn into office until January, these newly-elected members – three Democrats and 13 Republicans – come to Washington to tour the buildings, learn rules of decorum, and meet with their future coworkers. The new Senators come largely from open seats where both parties had a new candidate on the ticket and include a handful of tea partyers.
    11/16/2010 07:15 pm

  • 10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    The 2010 elections were tough on all Democrats, but particularly on female lawmakers. The upcoming 112th Congress may see fewer women in office on Capitol Hill than last session. Yet-to-decided races in the House and Senate will determine if that happens, but if it does, it would be the first time in 32 years that the number of women in Congress declines from one session to the next. What's already clear is that 10 women are not returning. Most of the congresswomen defeated Tuesday were House freshmen. Two had served multiple House terms, and one was a Senate veteran. Some lost to tea party favorites and conservatives backed by Sarah Palin, while others were bested by standard-issue Republicans. Here are the women, some familiar and some not, we will not see on Capitol Hill come January as a result of Election Day losses. Source: CNN, National Journal‚ Almanac of American Politics, Politico
    11/05/2010 06:16 pm

  • Tea Party Top 10 biggest winners and losers

    The emergence of the tea party movement is arguably the most dynamic element of the 2010 midterm elections. Many 'tea party' candidates won the backing of former Alaska governor Sarah Palin – but also earned the disdain of the Republican establishment. In the end, which candidates with tea party support won, who lost, and what's next?
    11/03/2010 05:10 pm

  • After GOP landslide of Election 2010, what next for Obama?

    Election 2010 voters sent a strong message of discontent to President Obama on the economy. They also handed him a big political challenge: work toward greater bipartisanship.
    11/03/2010 09:06 am

  • Tea Party Tally Rand Paul's big Senate test: Can tea party compromise?

    Will Rand Paul's promised tea party caucus in the Senate be able to stop government spending or be forced (gasp) to compromise on the shape of 'constitutional government'?
    11/03/2010 02:09 am

  • Tea Party Tally How the tea party helped GOP find a path to Election Day successes

    Victories for tea-party candidates Rand Paul, Marco Rubio, and Jim DeMint showed the impact of the nascent conservative movement on the GOP's ability to project a winning posture.
    11/02/2010 11:55 pm

  • Gallery Election day 2010

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Danny Bent poses at the starting line of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass.

After the Boston Marathon bombings, Danny Bent took on a cross-country challenge

The athlete-adventurer co-founded a relay run called One Run for Boston that started in Los Angeles and ended at the marathon finish line to raise funds for victims.

 
 
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