Topic: Johannesburg

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  • Rising world food prices may soon hit Africa hard, but could be a future boon

    Rising world food prices may soon hit Africa hard, but could be a future boon

    The World Bank warned Tuesday that global food prices are reaching 'dangerous' levels. Africa is bracing for short-term trouble, but sustained high prices could spark agribusiness investment across the continent.

  • Photos of the Day Photos of the day 02/15

    Lionesses stand in a cage in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. With help from Bolivian government officials, 25 lions were rescued from traveling circuses in Bolivia by the nongovernmental organization Animal Defenders International. Bolivian law prohibits the use of wild animals in public performances.

  • Global News Blog Soap operas bring linguistic democracy to South Africa

    In South Africa, soap operas have helped eliminate the linguistic boundaries between English and the 11 other languages adopted at the end of apartheid.

  • State of the Nation: Zuma's jobs focus brings sighs of relief in South Africa

    State of the Nation: Zuma's jobs focus brings sighs of relief in South Africa

    South Africa President Jacob Zuma promised a $1.2 billion fund to create jobs, but critics and supporters alike question whether his government has the capacity or will to deliver.

  • South Sudan's next task: build a nation from scratch

    South Sudan's next task: build a nation from scratch

    South Sudanese voted overwhelming in January for independence. Now, they face the reality of building the world's newest nation – from printing new currency to collecting taxes.

  • South Africa's truckers threaten 'devastating' strike

    Inflation could spike from repeated wage hikes, economist warn, although ignoring union demands threatens to create instability in South Africa.

  • How revolt in Egypt, Tunisia plays in South Africa

    Africa Monitor How revolt in Egypt, Tunisia plays in South Africa

    As the number of young people in South Africa increases and access to the Internet improves, so too will access to the kind of resistance we’re witnessing in Egypt and Tunisia, writes guest blogger Khadija Patel.

  • Why Tunisia's winds of change aren't blowing south to sub-Saharan Africa

    The winds of change that swept aside Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali have swiftly blown east to test the long-serving leaders of Egypt, Yemen, and Jordan. Yet if these winds can blow east across North Africa to the Middle East, can't they also blow south to sub-Saharan Africa? Surely there are plenty of dictators in Africa's other countries who have outworn their welcome after 20-plus years in power? Perhaps, but different societies respond to the same conditions in very different ways, and the 53 countries of the African continent each has its own social structure and attitudes toward those in power. Here are four reasons why, despite the massive protests in North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa remains silent.

  • Photos of the Day Photos of the day 01/27

    Gober, an elderly female Sumatran orangutan who is blind in both eyes due to cataracts, lies down with her twin babies at a rehabilitation center in Sibolangit, North Sumatra, Indonesia. The twins were born on Jan. 21, from two blind parents.

  • Why South Africans' reverence for Nelson Mandela runs so deep

    Africa Monitor Why South Africans' reverence for Nelson Mandela runs so deep

    This week's flurry of news about former President Nelson Mandela's hospital visit illustrates South Africans' powerful feelings for the man they credit for holding the country together on its path toward democracy.