Topic: Jalal Talabani

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  • Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    The US troop surge in 2007 helped quiet Iraq's bloody civil war. But it failed to deliver on what US officials and officers said was crucial for Iraq's future at the time: sectarian reconciliation. Rather than forging a new national identity out of the horrors of Iraq's war, Iraq's Shiite and Sunni Arabs and ethnic Kurds sullenly retreated to their own sectarian corners, and the country's political parties remain vehicles for ethnic or sectarian interests. The next year is probably going to be the most crucial for determining the future of Iraq since the US-led invasion of 2003, as Iraq's various political factions compete for power and influence without foreign troops getting in the way. Here are a few of the major players.

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  • Iraqi lawmakers elect new president as attacks kill dozens

    Iraq elected a new president in the latest step toward forming a new government, as a series of attacks killed dozens of people and Islamic militants destroyed a Muslim shrine on Thursday.

  • As Kurds seize Iraq oil fields, independence push exposes divisions

    Independence for Iraqi Kurdistan is looking inevitable, with Kurdish fighters seizing more territory from Iraq's central government today. But one key Kurdish faction is wary of going it alone.

  • Kurdish-Iraqi government talks collapse amid fear of civil war

    Talks between the Kurds and Iraq's central government on pulling back troops in disputed areas are collapsing. What does is mean for Prime Minister Maliki?

  • Iraq's unity tested by rising tensions over oil-rich Kurdish region

    As Iraqi Kurdistan ramps up oil production that could soon surpass Libya's output, Kurdish leaders have warned they may seek independence if disputes over oil revenues, power-sharing aren't resolved.

  • Real triumph of Arab League summit: That it happened at all

    The Arab League took little action to address Syria crisis, deferring to UN. But the summit, held in a renovated marble palace with gold-encrusted dates for dessert, still marked a triumph for host Iraq.

  • Arab leaders stay away from Baghdad summit

    The turnout in Iraq by regional leaders wasn't very high for Thursday's meeting. But those who did show up appealed to the Syrian government to stop the violence.

  • Iraq's Maliki accused of jailing, torturing opponents

    Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki was accused by former prime minister and rival Ayad Allawi of using the security services to torture members of opposition groups into giving false confessions.

  • Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    The US troop surge in 2007 helped quiet Iraq's bloody civil war. But it failed to deliver on what US officials and officers said was crucial for Iraq's future at the time: sectarian reconciliation. Rather than forging a new national identity out of the horrors of Iraq's war, Iraq's Shiite and Sunni Arabs and ethnic Kurds sullenly retreated to their own sectarian corners, and the country's political parties remain vehicles for ethnic or sectarian interests. The next year is probably going to be the most crucial for determining the future of Iraq since the US-led invasion of 2003, as Iraq's various political factions compete for power and influence without foreign troops getting in the way. Here are a few of the major players.

  • Biden brings down curtain on US Iraq operations (VIDEO)

    Biden brings down curtain on US Iraq operations (VIDEO)

    US military marked the end of its Iraq operations in a ceremony attended by Vice President Joe Biden and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. The remaining 13,000 US troops are due to withdraw by end of year.

  • After war in Iraq, Biden heralds new era of US involvement

    After war in Iraq, Biden heralds new era of US involvement

    Vice President Joe Biden made a surprise trip to Baghdad yesterday to honor US sacrifices in the war in Iraq.