Topic: Howard Webb

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  • Gallery Top 2010 World Cup controversies

    VUVUZELAS: Worldwide audiences and soccer stars – including Portugal’s Cristiano Ronaldo and Argentina’s Lionel Messi – have complained about the incessant high-pitched whine of the long plastic horns, called vuvuzelas, seen here at Ellis Park Stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa. That reignited calls to ban the vuvuzela, but FIFA chief Sepp Blatter put an end to that discussion early in the tournament. A Cape Town businessman has touted his design for a slightly quieter vuvuzela that reduces the tuneless horn's sound output from a deafening 134 decibels to a more manageable 121 decibels. That sounds good.

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  •  Spain wins World Cup final, makes history with Iniesta extratime goal

    Africa Monitor Spain wins World Cup final, makes history with Iniesta extratime goal

    Spain wins World Cup final in an ugly game filled with hard fouls and cynical dives. Dutch stars Arjen Robben and Wesley Sneijder failed to have the big match they needed to beat the pre-tournament favorites.

  • Instant replay? Some World Cup refs ready to embrace technology

    Instant replay? Some World Cup refs ready to embrace technology

    Instant replay isn't allowed in the World Cup now, but some refs are open to it down the road.

  • Gallery Top 2010 World Cup controversies

    VUVUZELAS: Worldwide audiences and soccer stars – including Portugal’s Cristiano Ronaldo and Argentina’s Lionel Messi – have complained about the incessant high-pitched whine of the long plastic horns, called vuvuzelas, seen here at Ellis Park Stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa. That reignited calls to ban the vuvuzela, but FIFA chief Sepp Blatter put an end to that discussion early in the tournament. A Cape Town businessman has touted his design for a slightly quieter vuvuzela that reduces the tuneless horn's sound output from a deafening 134 decibels to a more manageable 121 decibels. That sounds good.