Topic: Herman Cain

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  • Mitt Romney's 15 percent tax rate: How does it compare to Obama or Perry?

    Mitt Romney said Tuesday his tax rate is about 15 percent of his income. Barack and Michelle Obama paid 25 percent.

  • Jon Huntsman set to drop out, back Romney. Will it make a difference?

    Given the nature of Republican primary voting, moderate GOP candidate Jon Huntsman was a long shot from the beginning. He's set to endorse Mitt Romney, although it's unclear how much difference that will make in a race for the nomination that already favors Romney.

  • The Monitor's View And the winner in Iowa is ... baby-kissing retail politics

    Santorum's near-win over well-monied Romney is a victory for face-to-face campaigning – even democracy itself – as well as small-state presidential contests.

  • Despite Ron Paul surge, tea party hopes on the ropes in Iowa

    Despite Ron Paul surge, tea party hopes on the ropes in Iowa

    As tea party support splinters along more traditional political lines, polls show that hopes for nominating a conservative outsider who embodies constitutional ideals have withered. The question now is whether tea partiers will embrace a more conventional presidential nominee.

  • Election 101: How an Iowa GOP caucus works

    Election 101: How an Iowa GOP caucus works

    Contrary to popular belief, the Iowa caucuses are not a part of the state populated by Georgians, Armenians, and Azerbaijanis. Sorry, bad pun. (See Caucasus, a region of Eurasia.) But there is some confusion about what the Iowa caucuses are, exactly. So in a few easy steps, let us explain what will happen in the Hawkeye State the evening of Jan. 3 – the first presidential nominating contest of the season.

  • A year of oops: five big political gaffes of 2011

    A year of oops: five big political gaffes of 2011

    There’s nothing like a presidential campaign cycle to bring out big political gaffes – at times injecting doubt about candidates, but also offering some much-needed comic relief and glimpses of humanity. 2011 had some doozies, and some of the most memorable actually weren’t on the campaign trail. GOP presidential candidate Michele Bachmann, who said the “shot heard round the world” was fired in New Hampshire (correct answer: Massachusetts), nailed the politicians’ dilemma perfectly: "People can make mistakes, and I wish I could be perfect every time I say something, but I can't." Here are five of the biggest political “uh-ohs” of 2011:

  • Could Romney 'train' be derailed by Gingrich? Perry? Someone new?

    The Vote Could Romney 'train' be derailed by Gingrich? Perry? Someone new?

    The word 'inevitable' is getting tossed around these days when it comes to Mitt Romney and the GOP nomination. But Newt Gingrich remains a real rival, and it's even still possible for a newcomer to enter the contest.

  • In GOP race, Iowa and New Hampshire aren't what they used to be

    In GOP race, Iowa and New Hampshire aren't what they used to be

    Iowa still goes first in the presidential nominating contests, followed by New Hampshire. But voters there have lost their outsized influence in personally sizing up nominees, as televised debates and social media take precedence. 

  • Racist newsletters put Ron Paul on the defensive for first time

    Racist newsletters put Ron Paul on the defensive for first time

    Long-ago Ron Paul newsletters are getting attention for their inclusion of slurs against black Americans. The Texas congressman is also taking fire for his foreign policy views.

  • Gingrich rise and fall: A question of decency?

    Walter Rodgers Gingrich rise and fall: A question of decency?

    Newt Gingrich’s earlier spike in the polls, and Republican voters' enduring wariness of ‘Mr. Clean’ Romney, raise the question: How is it that voters loathe Obama, with a personal history of high moral standing and liberal policies, while supporting a conservative with a history of immorality?