Topic: Henry Sokolski

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  • START debate: 3 things nuclear arms treaty would do, 3 things it won't

    START debate: 3 things nuclear arms treaty would do, 3 things it won't

    On the grand scale of nuclear arms reduction, the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty President Obama signed with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev last April – known in Washington shorthand as New START – is considered a modest document. Yet it has become a lightning rod for contentious debate over related issues like missile defense and US-Russia relations, which the treaty does not directly address. The push is on for the Senate to ratify New START before the lame-duck session ends. The treaty is endorsed by former President George H.W. Bush (R), whose support may offset the suggestion that New START’s ratification would mainly be a foreign-policy boost to a Democratic president whom the Republicans just a month ago had on the ropes. Here’s a look at three things New START would accomplish – and three things it would not.

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  • Iran accelerates uranium enrichment: Danger or bluff?

    Iran accelerates uranium enrichment: Danger or bluff?

    Western experts aren't sure why Iran is speeding up its nuclear enrichment. Is it bravado for domestic political consumption or a genuine move toward developing weapons that can be hidden from attack?

  • Will Fukushima crisis chill civilian nuclear energy deals?

    Will Fukushima crisis chill civilian nuclear energy deals?

    Experts warn that Fukushima should sound an alarm on the safety and security dangers inherent in the spread of civilian nuclear fuels and the proliferation of nuclear technology.

  • START debate: 3 things nuclear arms treaty would do, 3 things it won't

    START debate: 3 things nuclear arms treaty would do, 3 things it won't

    On the grand scale of nuclear arms reduction, the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty President Obama signed with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev last April – known in Washington shorthand as New START – is considered a modest document. Yet it has become a lightning rod for contentious debate over related issues like missile defense and US-Russia relations, which the treaty does not directly address. The push is on for the Senate to ratify New START before the lame-duck session ends. The treaty is endorsed by former President George H.W. Bush (R), whose support may offset the suggestion that New START’s ratification would mainly be a foreign-policy boost to a Democratic president whom the Republicans just a month ago had on the ropes. Here’s a look at three things New START would accomplish – and three things it would not.

  • Why Iran's nuclear reactor may not be an immediate threat

    Why Iran's nuclear reactor may not be an immediate threat

    Iran's Bushehr nuclear reactor is set to be loaded with fuel Saturday. Some hawks say bomb it now, but leading nuclear experts advocate a wait-and-see approach.

  • Republican skepticism challenges US-Russia treaty on nuclear weapons

    Republican skepticism challenges US-Russia treaty on nuclear weapons

    President Obama is facing Republican opposition and midterm elections in his push to have the US-Russia Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty ratified before year's end.

  • US objects to China-Pakistan nuclear deal. Hypocritical?

    US objects to China-Pakistan nuclear deal. Hypocritical?

    The Obama administration objects to China selling nuclear reactors to Pakistan, which has never signed the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. But the US sealed a similar deal with India.

  • Will secret technology help rogue nations get nuclear weapons?

    Will secret technology help rogue nations get nuclear weapons?

    New technology uses lasers to enrich uranium for nuclear power. Critics say it's approval would hamper nuclear weapons nonproliferation goals.

  • Clinton, Ahmadinejad to face off at UN over nuclear nonproliferation

    Clinton, Ahmadinejad to face off at UN over nuclear nonproliferation

    Secretary Clinton will declare the 40 year-old Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty threatened by Iran and North Korea, while Iran's Ahmadinejad is expected to criticize world powers for failing at disarmament.

  • UN conference on nuclear proliferation a big test for Obama

    UN conference on nuclear proliferation a big test for Obama

    The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty conference opens at the United Nations on Monday. Reducing nuclear weapons is a key issue for President Obama, but there are many challenges.

  • Nuclear power: Obama team touts mini-nukes to fight global warming

    Nuclear power: Obama team touts mini-nukes to fight global warming

    Miniature, mass-produced nuclear power plants, along with other alternative energy sources, can help the US address global warming, says Energy Secretary Steven Chu. Critics see that plan as raising the risk of proliferation of nuclear materials.