Topic: Henry M. Paulson

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  • Goldman Sachs: Superstar firm falls back to Earth

    Goldman Sachs: Superstar firm falls back to Earth

    Goldman Sachs posts higher-than-expected loss of $428 million. Quarterly loss is only the second since the firm went public.

  • Top Picks: a musical tribute to Bob Dylan, 'Too Big To Fail,' Azam Ali's latest album, and more

    Top Picks: a musical tribute to Bob Dylan, 'Too Big To Fail,' Azam Ali's latest album, and more

    Recordings of famous musicians performing Bob Dylan classics, an HBO movie about the 2008 economic crisis, a collection of lullabies sung by music superstar Azam Ali, and more recommendations.

  • Opinion 'Atlas Shrugged': With America on the brink, should you 'go Galt' and strike?

    In the face of onslaught, the heroes of Ayn Rand's 'Atlas Shrugged' (now in theaters) decided to stop working, retreat to a valley, and try to rebuild only when the country had collapsed. What we really need to reject, Rand advised, are the flawed moral ideals that cause our economic troubles.

  • Causes of the financial crisis? Commission ends in hung jury.

    Causes of the financial crisis? Commission ends in hung jury.

    In its final report, the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission offers three views of the crisis -– essentially one from Democrats and two dissenting views by Republicans on the panel.

  • Ideas for a better world in 2011

    Ideas for a better world in 2011

    In many ways, 2010 is a year you may want to relegate to the filing cabinet quickly. It began with a massive earthquake in Haiti and wound down with North Korea once again being an enfant terrible – bizarrely trying to conduct diplomacy through brinkmanship. In between came Toyota recalls and egg scares, pat downs at airports and unyielding unemployment numbers, too little money in the Irish treasury and too many bedbugs in American sheets. Oil gushed from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico for three months, mocking the best intentions of man and technology to stop it, while ash from a volcano in Iceland darkened Europe temporarily as much as its balance sheets. Yet not all was gloomy. The winter Olympics in Canada and the World Cup in South Africa dazzled with their displays of athletic prowess and national pride, becoming hearths around which the world gathered. In Switzerland, the world's largest atom smasher hurled two protons into each other at unfathomable speeds. Then came the year's most poignant moment – the heroic and improbable rescue of 33 miners from the clutches of the Chilean earth. There were many transitions, too – the return of the Republicans in Washington and the Tories in Britain, the scaling back of one war (Iraq) and the escalation of another (Afghanistan), the fall of some powers (Greece) and rise of others (China, Germany, Lady Gaga). To get the new year off to the right start, we decided to ask various thinkers for one idea each to make the world a better place in 2011. We plumbed poets and political figures, physicists and financiers, theologians and novelists. Some of the ideas are provocative, others quixotic. Some you will agree with, others you won't. But in the modest quest to stir a discussion – from academic salons to living rooms to government corridors – we offer these 25 ideas.

  • "Decision Points": George Bush's view of his presidency

    "Decision Points": George Bush's view of his presidency

    In his new memoir "Decision Points," George W. Bush weighs in on the Iraq war, the financial crisis, Hurricane Katrina, John McCain's 2008 campaign, and other episodes in his presidency.

  • Inside Job: movie review

    Inside Job: movie review

    Matt Damon narrates 'Inside Job,' a meticulous exploration of what led to the crash of 2008.

  • Best political books of 2010

    Chapter & Verse Best political books of 2010

    There have been plenty of political titles this year – from the left and the right. But which were best?

  • What's the best political book you've read this year?

    Editorial Board Blog What's the best political book you've read this year?

  • Finance bill: A mountain of paper, a molehill of reform

    Robert Reich Finance bill: A mountain of paper, a molehill of reform

    The American people will continue to have to foot the bill for the mistakes of Wall Street’s biggest banks because the legislation does nothing to diminish their economic and political power.