Topic: Greenland

All Content

  • Opinion Founding Fathers' advice to deficit 'super committee': Bring US troops home

    If the deficit 'super committee' is serious about finding $1.5 trillion in cuts over the next decade, they will have no choice but to do as the Founding Fathers would have done – bring the troops home and drastically reduce America's foreign military presence.

  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

  • Summer solstice: Everything you want to know

    Summer solstice: Everything you want to know

    Summer solstice: Summer arrives to the Northern Hemisphere at 1:16pm Eastern time on Tuesday.

  • Iceland volcano eruption larger than last year's, closes airport

    Iceland volcano eruption larger than last year's, closes airport

    Iceland volcano: the eruption of an Iceland volcano, Saturday, is larger than last year's Eyjafjallajokull eruption that shut down air travel in Europe.

  • In Pictures Space photos of the day: Currents

    Though the above image may resemble a painting straight out of an art gallery in Venice Beach, California, it is in fact a satellite image of the sands and seaweed in the Bahamas. Tides and ocean currents in the Bahamas sculpted the sand and seaweed beds into these multicolored, fluted patterns in much the same way that winds sculpted the vast sand dunes in the Sahara Desert.

  • A Nordic feast of spring in 'Noma'

    Stir It Up! A Nordic feast of spring in 'Noma'

    Chef René Redzepi strives to revive and reinvent the distinctive tastes of Nordic cuisine through his restaurant 'Noma' and cookbook of the same name.

  • 9 books Bill Gates thinks you should read

    9 books Bill Gates thinks you should read

    Nonprofit group TED asks some of the world's most fascinating thinkers to share both ideas and reading lists. Here's a list of the nine books recommended by Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates.

  • In Pictures Space photos of the day: Auroras

    Aurora Australis (curtain form) is seen from the Space Shuttle Endeavour, part of which can be seen in left foreground, in April 1994.

  • Snow storm routine getting old? No worries, the groundhog got it right.

    Snow storm routine getting old? No worries, the groundhog got it right.

    The weather pattern that sent snow storm after snow storm across the US is breaking down, leading to forecasts of one of the biggest snow meltdowns 'we have ever seen.'

  • Winter storm raises the question: What's going on with the weather?

    Winter storm raises the question: What's going on with the weather?

    This week's winter storm – and others before it – are being influenced by climate patterns in the Arctic and North Atlantic. Scientists are working to understand how these patterns work.