Topic: Franklin D. Roosevelt

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  • Election 101: Five basics about 'super PACs' and 2012 campaign money

    Election 101: Five basics about 'super PACs' and 2012 campaign money

    The 'super PAC' promises to shake up the 2012 election. This new fundraising heavyweight – which Stephen Colbert famously brought attention to with his own Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow – heralds a new era of 'superspending' in politics. Here are the basics about super PACs and how their emergence may influence elections.

  • Is the 'Occupy Wall Street' movement being hijacked by newcomers?

    Is the 'Occupy Wall Street' movement being hijacked by newcomers?

    More people and organizations are joining Occupy Wall Street or expressing solidarity every day. Whether it's an infusion of vital energy or a force that tears at cohesion is up to the movement.

  • Opinion Occupy Wall Street: an American tradition since 1776

    The 'Occupy Wall Street' protesters aren't extremists on the fringe. They reflect the frustrations of large swaths of American society. By taking aim at corporate greed and corruption, they embody a venerable tradition of American populism with roots back to Jefferson.

  • Social Security: Ponzi scheme or political football?

    Social Security: Ponzi scheme or political football?

    Social Security debate reignited with Rick Perry's critique of Social Security as a Ponzi scheme.

  • The Monitor's View Can Obama's rhetoric lift the economy?

    Optimism by a president can be a force multiplier in the economy as much as government action. Obama's speech to Congress is a chance to restore his credibility as an inspiring orator and economic leader, able to persuade Americans to invest and spend.

  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

  • In Pictures Presidential transport

    The bus used by President Obama to travel around Minnesota, Iowa, and Illinois is parked on the tarmac of Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport on Aug. 15.

  • Manufacturing Hysteria: A History of Scapegoating, Surveillance, and Secrecy in Modern America

    Manufacturing Hysteria: A History of Scapegoating, Surveillance, and Secrecy in Modern America

    A call to arms about the government's use of scare tactics.

  • Stock market crash: Think 1938, not 2008

    The Reformed Broker Stock market crash: Think 1938, not 2008

    Stock market debacle doesn't necessarily signal a spectacular crash. The stock market may be reacting to prospects of a garden-variety recession.

  • America's big shift right

    America's big shift right

    Why the country's conservative drift, on a wide range of issues, has accelerated.