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  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

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    A boy abducted '94 from Indiana has been found in Minnesota, officials report. The boy's identity - Richard Wayne Landers Jr. - was confirmed by his paternal grandparents, who abducted him during a custody dispute when he was 5 years old.

  • Change Agent Libraries reinvent themselves as labs of creativity

    Local libraries are becoming centers for creativity and innovation – not only places to borrow stuff, but also places to make stuff.

  • Aung San Suu Kyi wants sanctions against Myanmar(Burma) lifted

    The Burmese opposition leader, who's now a member of the country's Parliament, is urging an end to US sanctions against her impoverished nation.

  • Indie workers: Is self-employment the new norm?

    Facing a sluggish economy where jobs aren't as secure, A growing number of US workers are foregoing traditional employment to strike out on their own. Some left the workforce for more flexibility, while others were forced into self-employment by an uncertain job market.

  • Girl Scouts under scrutiny from Catholic bishops

    Conservative criticism of alleged Girl Scouts policy on sexuality, birth control, and abortion pulls the organization back into the culture wars with an investigation by Catholic bishops. It's not the first time the girls have been caught in political crossfire.

  • Change Agent Looking for a few good boomers to help others

    Retiring baby boomers are proving to be valuable volunteers. 'A part of paying for our spot on earth is to help those who need help,' says one.

  • 200 cats removed from New York home

    A homeowner in Hopewell Junction, N.Y. faces 41 counts of animal cruelty for keeping 200 cats in her home. In Fort Wayne, 70 cats were removed from a home Monday.

  • Indiana union bill: Even with Dems AWOL, lawmakers move closer to vote

    Most Indiana Democrats have stayed away from the opening of the state House session out of protest for a bill they say is harmful to unions. Still, a committee held a hearing on the bill Friday.

  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.