Topic: Enron Corporation

Featured

  • Facebook IPO: Six key dates in its debacle

    Facebook's first week as a publicly traded company will go down as a terribly botched corporate launch, perhaps one of the worst in recent history for such a highly visible entity. Eight days ago, it was the tech world's most highly anticipated initial public offering in eight years. Now, the social media company faces mounting legal woes and serves as an embarrassing example of how not to run an IPO. Despite rising insider pessimism about its growth prospects, Facebook kept boosting its asking price and the number of shares it would sell. The result: billions of dollars in losses; investigations by two congressional committees, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), an industry watchdog, and the state of Massachusetts; at least 13 class-action lawsuits; and thousands of resentful shareholders who days later still were unsure how many Facebook shares they had or at what price. Here are six key dates in Facebook's unfolding IPO disaster.

All Content

  • India's upstart party preaches anticorruption. What else does it stand for?

    One of the founders of the Aam Aadmi Party resigned yesterday. The party's popularity has surged, but its candidates espouse an almost farcical range of policies.

  • Reader recommendation: The Smartest Guys in the Room

    Monitor readers share their favorite book picks.

  • U.S. accuses JPMorgan: Bank pays $410 million settlement

    U.S. accuses JPMorgan: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission says JPMorgan traders manipulated electricity prices. JPMorgan Chase & Co. agreed to pay $410 million on Tuesday to settle the claim by U.S. energy regulators.

  • US accuses JPMorgan of manipulating power prices

    US accuses JPMorgan of squeezing excessive payments from the agencies that run the power grids in California and the Midwest, federal officials said Monday. US official fined a British power company $453 million for similar offenses to the ones of which JPMorgan stands accused .

  • Energy Voices JPMorgan Chase accused of rigging energy markets

    JPMorgan Chase developed schemes to sell electricity at falsely attractive prices in Michigan and California, according to The New York Times. The market manipulation could result in JPMorgan Chase receiving penalties from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. 

  • Robert Reich BP oil spill settlement: why BP is not a criminal

    The Justice Department’s criminal settlement with BP gives their top executives a free pass — allowing the public to believe justice has been done, Reich writes.

  • California gas prices take a dip, amid calls to investigate the spike

    Californians are still reeling from the unprecedented spike in gas prices last week – for no apparent reason. Lawmakers call for a federal investigation of whether foul play sent prices soaring.

  • LIBOR scandal: Will Feds target not just employees, but a whole bank?

    If a bank reporting its lending rates has given intentionally inaccurate numbers, that could be a crime, say experts. Prosecutors have been poring over documents related to LIBOR for two years.

  • Facebook IPO: Six key dates in its debacle

    Facebook's first week as a publicly traded company will go down as a terribly botched corporate launch, perhaps one of the worst in recent history for such a highly visible entity. Eight days ago, it was the tech world's most highly anticipated initial public offering in eight years. Now, the social media company faces mounting legal woes and serves as an embarrassing example of how not to run an IPO. Despite rising insider pessimism about its growth prospects, Facebook kept boosting its asking price and the number of shares it would sell. The result: billions of dollars in losses; investigations by two congressional committees, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), an industry watchdog, and the state of Massachusetts; at least 13 class-action lawsuits; and thousands of resentful shareholders who days later still were unsure how many Facebook shares they had or at what price. Here are six key dates in Facebook's unfolding IPO disaster.

  • Seven retirement questions you need to answer

    Retirement planning isn't easy. Nearly half of Americans don't feel financially prepared to live to age 75, according to a survey from Northwestern Mutual. But the process is a lot less burdensome if you break the task down into simpler parts. Here are seven questions to ask as you plan for your long-term financial security in retirement.