Topic: Credit CARD Act

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  • Three best ways (and three worst ways) to finance holiday shopping

    Consumers tend to rack up a lot of credit card debt during the fourth quarter, largely due to holiday expenses. This year, by one estimate, the average holiday shopper is on track to spend around $800. For many, that means financing, which remains a double-edged sword despite historically low interest rates and an array of new consumer protections. It can either save you a lot of money in interest and fees or trip you up with caveats buried in fine print that drastically inflate your expenses. Here are three of the best and three of the worst financing offers for holiday shoppers in 2012:

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  • Three best ways (and three worst ways) to finance holiday shopping

    Consumers tend to rack up a lot of credit card debt during the fourth quarter, largely due to holiday expenses. This year, by one estimate, the average holiday shopper is on track to spend around $800. For many, that means financing, which remains a double-edged sword despite historically low interest rates and an array of new consumer protections. It can either save you a lot of money in interest and fees or trip you up with caveats buried in fine print that drastically inflate your expenses. Here are three of the best and three of the worst financing offers for holiday shoppers in 2012:

  • Parents spending less on students’ college expenses, study says

    A new study by student loan lender Sallie Mae finds that parents are spending less to help their children pay for college. Choosing less expensive schools and living at home are two ways families are limiting costs.

  • Saving Money Credit cards: Top 5 cards for grads

    Credit cards for high school and college graduates offer cash back and, most importantly, no annual fee. If you're not sure you qualify for regular credit cards, there's an option for you, too.

  • Saving Money Credit cards bring back no-fee, no-interest offers

    Credit cards offer zero-percent balance transfer with no transfer fees to new customers. Zero-percent credit cards are a good deal, if consumers make sure they stay out of debt.

  • First credit card? Five key tips for college students.

    First credit card? Five key tips for college students.

    If getting a credit card is a rite of passage for college students, choosing the right plastic and learning how to use it responsibly is a matter of life and debt. Young people age 18 to 24, carry an average credit card debt of $2,002, according to CreditKarma.com. Before you end up as a debt statistic, learn to pick the right card and manage your credit before getting your hands on plastic. Here are five things every new credit cardholder should know:

  • Credit cards: How high does your card rank?

    Credit cards: How high does your card rank?

    Credit card companies are getting higher marks from consumers, according to a J.D Power study.

  • Getting bin Laden and five other boosts to Obama's reelection bid

    Getting bin Laden and five other boosts to Obama's reelection bid

    "Yes We Can” was so 2008. Now President Obama is the incumbent, with a record to defend. More than whom the Republicans nominate to run against him in 2012, how voters perceive Mr. Obama’s accomplishments and liabilities – two highly subjective categories, at times overlapping – will determine whether he gets four more years. Here are his top six accomplishments, including the killing of Osama bin Laden:

  • Credit cards? Nah! Americans moving to cash, debit cards.

    Credit cards? Nah! Americans moving to cash, debit cards.

    Credit cards are losing their luster as a method of payment, especially among young adults.

  • Gift cards: Stuck with one? Sell it.

    Gift cards: Stuck with one? Sell it.

    Gift cards are supposed to be the easy answer for that person on your holiday list who has everything. But with $30 billion worth of cards unredeemed, there’s clearly something wrong. Here are four tips if you’re stuck with one you’ll never use – or thinking of buying one for someone else.

  • Debit card fees: Senate votes for limits, seeking to aid consumers

    Debit card fees: Senate votes for limits, seeking to aid consumers

    Retailers are the ones paying debit card fees, but the idea is that if the costs were lowered, retailers might then pass some of the savings along to consumers.