Topic: Christian Science Publishing Society

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  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

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  • Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Looking back: The Monitor's coverage of 9/11

    Ten years ago, The Monitor had recently moved into a renovated newsroom on the second floor of the venerable Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston. It featured new, modular desks, carpeting instead of linoleum, and many large TV monitors hung from the ceiling. They were tuned to various network and cable channels, but with the sound turned off, normally. So the first indication of a crisis on 9/11 was a chilling silent image of smoke billowing from the North Tower of the World Trade Center, an image that spread from screen to screen across the newsroom. When the second plane hit, 17 minutes after the first, it was clear that the United States was under attack. We had four hours till deadline that day. Four hours in which to try to make sense of what had just happened. Reporters, editors, photographers, editorial writers, columnists, feature writers, even editors and writers of the religious article that appears in the Monitor daily, sprang into action. It was the beginning of days, weeks, and months of reporting and analysis of that incident and its aftermath that would follow. The list below represents some of the most significant reporting and writing we did that day and on subsequent days. The 9/11 stories and images are The Monitor's first draft of the history of that moment. Like most first drafts, some could do with some revising now. But give credit to the swiftness with which they had to be written -- especially those produced that first day and week -- and the decades (if not centuries) of accumulated wisdom, knowledge, and expertise they represent on the part of a staff that worked around the clock to bring them to you.

  • At Christian Science Annual Meeting, church officers say they're listening

    At Christian Science Annual Meeting, church officers say they're listening

    The Annual Meeting of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, took place Monday in Boston, with the Board of Directors encouraging a dialogue with church members.

  • Africa contributes biggest share of new members to Christian Science church

    At its Annual Meeting, the church emphasizes global outreach, financial stewardship

  • Our first century

    A mandate to 'lighten' still drives the Monitor at the dawn of its second 100 years.

  • Monitor shifts from print to Web-based strategy

    In 2009, the Monitor will become the first nationally circulated newspaper to replace its daily print edition with its website; the 100 year-old news organization will also offer subscribers weekly print and daily e-mail editions.

  • Richard Bergenheim: an appreciation

    Difference Maker Richard Bergenheim: an appreciation

    As editor, he brought spiritual strength, compassion, and an omnivorous appetite for news.

  • John Yemma named Monitor editor

    John Yemma named Monitor editor

    After 20 years serving in senior editing posts at the Boston Globe, Yemma is rejoining the Monitor staff in mid-July.

  • Christian Scientists, at annual meeting, focus on Christly 'simplicity'

    Christian Scientists, at annual meeting, focus on Christly 'simplicity'

    The church increased savings and expenditures, according to reports. Monitor editor Richard Bergenheim takes on additional role as church president.

  • Margaret Rogers joins board of the Christian Science church

    She replaces retiring member M. Victor Westberg on the five-person board of directors.