Topic: Charles Schumer

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  • Lockerbie bomber case may reopen with new Libyan government

    Lockerbie bomber case may reopen with new Libyan government

    Lockerbie bomber: the US is calling for the Libyan transitional government to look at the Lockerbie bomber case while Abdel Baset al-Megrahi reportedly fades in and out of consciousness.

  • What happens next in Libya? America's five greatest concerns.

    What happens next in Libya? America's five greatest concerns.

    The push toward a post-Qaddafi regime in Libya is raising questions in Washington about how far a US commitment extends to ensuring a peaceful transition to democracy. The rationale for US and NATO engagement in Libya was to avoid a massacre of civilians in March. Now, as the civil war moves toward a resolution, the Obama administration and Congress appear to be taking a wait-and-see approach. But with an eye to lessons from regime change in Iraq, some lawmakers are urging steps now to help shape the transition in Libya, including some moves that put them at odds with the Obama administration. Here are five.

  • Who's who on Congress's debt 'super committee'

    Who's who on Congress's debt 'super committee'

    Congress has created a special super committee to devise a way to cut at least $1.2 trillion from US spending in coming years. Its real name is the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, and its deadline is Nov. 23. If a majority of the bipartisan, bicameral committee approves the plan, it goes to the House and Senate for a vote, and they must act by Dec. 23. If the plan is voted down, automatic spending cuts are slated to occur. Here are the 12 lawmakers serving on the super committee.

  • Now, Congress down to its last strike to avoid debt-ceiling default

    Now, Congress down to its last strike to avoid debt-ceiling default

    By rejecting the bill passed by the House Friday, the Senate essentially now has one last shot to get a debt ceiling increase through Congress before the Aug. 2 deadline.

  • Dueling debt-ceiling plans: Can either pass Congress?

    Dueling debt-ceiling plans: Can either pass Congress?

    House Republicans and Senate Democrats introduced their plans to resolve the debt-ceiling impasse before Aug. 2. But bipartisan hopes appear thin.

  • Trillion-dollar question in debt-ceiling talks: What can pass the House?

    Trillion-dollar question in debt-ceiling talks: What can pass the House?

    President Obama and the Senate appear to be on the same page in debt-ceiling talks. But House Republicans are so far holding firm on their no-new-taxes demands.

  • Out of options in debt ceiling talks? Nope, here are five.

    Out of options in debt ceiling talks? Nope, here are five.

    How many ways are there to resolve the debt ceiling crisis? Negotiators meeting at the White House seem to hit one impasse after another, and frustration on both sides is mounting as an Aug. 2 deadline looms to avoid default on America’s debt obligations. Still, at least five options for handling the matter have been discussed in recent days and months. Other possible solutions may well emerge, but here’s the state of play on the options to date.

  • How Capitol Hill sniping could set off a national debt ceiling bomb

    How Capitol Hill sniping could set off a national debt ceiling bomb

    Even as both parties cite the need for progress on the budget, the partisan sniping is becoming unusually personal. Could markets get the jitters if the rancor lasts up to the debt ceiling deadline?

  • GOP intensifies push for a balanced budget amendment. Why now?

    GOP intensifies push for a balanced budget amendment. Why now?

    Republicans in Congress want a vote on a balanced budget amendment to the US Constitution by mid-July. It would precede any vote to raise the national debt limit.

  • How much damage did ATF's ill-fated gun-running sting do to war on drugs?

    How much damage did ATF's ill-fated gun-running sting do to war on drugs?

    Fast and Furious, the Mexico gun-running sting gone bad, may cost the ATF's acting chief his job. A larger concern is that it may undermine efforts to stop the flow of US guns south.