Topic: Cairo (Illinois)

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  • Five of the costliest US river floods

    Five of the costliest US river floods

    The 2011 Mississippi River flood, which has broken records in some places, is creating steady destruction in America's midsection. Hurricanes tend to cause more financial damage, and flash floods typically take more lives. But overflowing rivers deliver a long, slow economic punch. Arkansas farmers have lost an estimated $500 million in crops to this year's flood. Mississippi homes and catfish farms – a leading industry – are threatened. In Louisiana, the diversion of water through a spillway to spare Baton Rouge and New Orleans still puts hundreds of homes, businesses, and chemical plants and oil refineries at risk. Total damages could run into the billions. Here's a look at five of the most expensive river floods in the US, according to estimates from the National Weather Service and historical accounts (reported in 2011 dollars):

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  • Along the Mississippi, river views trump flood protection

    Mississippi floods don't have the impact today that they had during the Great Flood of 1993, thanks to better flood walls and levees and thousands of flood-plain homes converted to green space. But in some river towns, flood protection is a non-starter.

  • How hot was 2012? Hottest on record in US, by a long shot (+video)

    Global warming 'has had a role' in making 2012 the hottest ever recorded in the lower 48 states, says a US climatologist. The average temperature was 54.3 degrees F., a full degree higher than the previous annual record.

  • Drought's winter toll: Mississippi barges face losses while US blasts river (+video)

    Traffic along 180 miles of the drought-stricken Mississippi will be curtailed for a month, at a cost of billions to the barging industry, to allow the US to blast rock formations and raise river levels.

  • Twice as many mega rainstorms in Midwest in past 50 years

    Wisconsin saw the biggest rise (203 percent) in extreme rainstorms – 3 inches of rain or more in a day, new study says. Climate change is behind more Midwest flooding, say scientists.

  • Five of the costliest US river floods

    Five of the costliest US river floods

    The 2011 Mississippi River flood, which has broken records in some places, is creating steady destruction in America's midsection. Hurricanes tend to cause more financial damage, and flash floods typically take more lives. But overflowing rivers deliver a long, slow economic punch. Arkansas farmers have lost an estimated $500 million in crops to this year's flood. Mississippi homes and catfish farms – a leading industry – are threatened. In Louisiana, the diversion of water through a spillway to spare Baton Rouge and New Orleans still puts hundreds of homes, businesses, and chemical plants and oil refineries at risk. Total damages could run into the billions. Here's a look at five of the most expensive river floods in the US, according to estimates from the National Weather Service and historical accounts (reported in 2011 dollars):

  • In Pictures Space photos of the day: Mississippi flooding

    The US Army Corps of Engineers detonated explosives at the Birds Point levee near Wyatt, Missouri, on May 2. Water from the intentional breach flooded a 130,000-acre stretch of land. Two more breaches were detonated on May 3 and 5. This image from the Advanced Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft shows the resultant flooding of farmland west of the Mississippi 20 miles south of the levee breach. On the image, vegetation is displayed in red, bare fields in gray and water in blue.

  • Monsoon in the Midwest: Records fall as Mississippi floodwaters rise

    Monsoon in the Midwest: Records fall as Mississippi floodwaters rise

    In broad areas of the Midwest, April rainfall was four times normal. Now floodwaters are flowing down the Mississippi, inundating farms and threatening to break records more than 70 years old.

  • In Pictures Mississippi River floods

    Two pickup trucks are surrounded by flood water outside a garage in Memphis, Tenn., on May 8. Memphis residents were being told to flee their homes for higher ground as the mighty Mississippi River edged toward the city, threatening to bring more flooding to parts of an area already soaked.

  • Mississippi River flooding: After levee blast, threat shifts to Memphis

    Mississippi River flooding: After levee blast, threat shifts to Memphis

    Late Monday, the US Army Corps of Engineers blasted a two-mile hole in a Mississippi River levee to relieve water pressure that was endangering Cairo, Ill. But problems remain downriver.

  • Record-breaking floods force engineers to blow up Mississippi River levee

    Record-breaking floods force engineers to blow up Mississippi River levee

    On Monday evening, the Army Corps of Engineers will flood farms in southern Missouri to save river towns, after a legal challenge by the Missouri attorney general failed Sunday.