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Topic: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

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  • START debate: 3 things nuclear arms treaty would do, 3 things it won't

    On the grand scale of nuclear arms reduction, the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty President Obama signed with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev last April – known in Washington shorthand as New START – is considered a modest document. Yet it has become a lightning rod for contentious debate over related issues like missile defense and US-Russia relations, which the treaty does not directly address. The push is on for the Senate to ratify New START before the lame-duck session ends. The treaty is endorsed by former President George H.W. Bush (R), whose support may offset the suggestion that New START’s ratification would mainly be a foreign-policy boost to a Democratic president whom the Republicans just a month ago had on the ropes. Here’s a look at three things New START would accomplish – and three things it would not.
    12/20/2010 07:30 pm

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  • Doomsday clock remains set at five minutes to midnight

    The iconic Doomsday Clock, which graces the cover of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, remains set to 11:55. It should be emphasized that the Doomsday Clock is not itself a doomsday device.

  • Russian nuclear support for Iran limited by distrust

    Russia has trained hundreds of Iranian nuclear scientists and blocked international action against Tehran. But beneath the surface, there is profound distrust. 

  • Opinion Russia should be rewarded with NATO membership

    Russia should be on the agenda for NATO summit in Chicago this weekend. In spite of recent tensions, the historically fractured relationship between Russia and NATO is the most ripe for transformation. Obstacles like missile defense and Eastern Europe can be resolved.

  • 'Doomsday Clock' moved forward. What has scientists worried?

    Scientists say they moved the 'Doomsday Clock' a minute closer to midnight because nations are failing to sufficiently address nuclear proliferation, climate change, and other global threats.

  • Doomsday Clock suggests danger to world grows

    The Doomsday Clock lost one minute due to the proliferation of nuclear weapons and continuing inaction on climate change.

  • START debate: 3 things nuclear arms treaty would do, 3 things it won't

    On the grand scale of nuclear arms reduction, the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty President Obama signed with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev last April – known in Washington shorthand as New START – is considered a modest document. Yet it has become a lightning rod for contentious debate over related issues like missile defense and US-Russia relations, which the treaty does not directly address. The push is on for the Senate to ratify New START before the lame-duck session ends. The treaty is endorsed by former President George H.W. Bush (R), whose support may offset the suggestion that New START’s ratification would mainly be a foreign-policy boost to a Democratic president whom the Republicans just a month ago had on the ropes. Here’s a look at three things New START would accomplish – and three things it would not.
    12/20/2010 07:30 pm

  • A stronger Iran returns to nuclear talks in Geneva

    Iran began talks Monday in Geneva with world powers eager to curb its expanded nuclear capabilities.
    12/06/2010 06:53 am

  • NPT 101: What does it take for a country to give up its nuclear weapons?

    South Africa dismantled its nuclear weapons after resisting fierce international sanctions for years. David Albright, who wrote extensively about that transition, says it may hold lessons – of patience and pressure – for dealing with Iran.
    05/06/2010 04:51 pm

  • Horizons Doomsday Clock shows signs for hope, need for progress

    The group behind the Doomsday Clock rolled back its hands to six minutes until midnight and warned that there's still much to be done.
    01/14/2010 02:48 pm

  • World powers tell Iran to answer fast on nuclear talks

    Officials from Germany and the five permanent members of the UN Security Council met in Frankfurt Wednesday.
    09/03/2009 01:00 am

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